Emotional Intelligence!

August 22, 2014

I read this book (Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman) several years ago and just recently discovered that several leadership competencies had been identified for each of the four fundamental EI capabilities.

Self-Awareness

  • Emotional self-awareness
  • Accurate self-assessment
  • Self-confidence

Self-Management

  • Self-control
  • Trustworthiness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Adaptability
  • Achievement orientation
  • Initiative

Social Awareness

  • Empathy
  • Organizational awareness
  • Service Orientation

Social Skills

  • Visionary leadership
  • Influence
  • Developing others
  • Communication
  • Change catalyst
  • Conflict management
  • Building bonds
  • Teamwork and collaboration

Here’s a link to a more in-depth look at these competencies (from the book Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence (by Goleman, Boyatzis, and McKee).

The Longing Woman, Part Two!

August 21, 2014

Thank  you for your patience . . .  here is the conclusion to this wonderful poem . . .

This to her spouse she did declare,
Who, hoping strongly for an heir,
With tears of joy embraced the fair,
“My dear,” said he, “My charming wife,
“Thou joy, thou comfort of my life,
“My heart is overwhelmed with joy,
“Pray heaven the child may be a boy;
“Be what it will, I here declare,
“That it shall be my only heir;
“At least, I’ll have no other wife,
“Though you shall die, my dearest life,
“Which Heaven forbid; you’re young, my dear,
“And may live many and many a year.”,

Jenny, who was at first afraid,
She had so oft the squire betrayed,
Was highly pleased with what he said;
For she, who never thought amiss,
Knew well the child was none of his.

And now came on her longing fits,
She longed at first for dainty bits;
The husband all things got with care,
In hopes to see the wished-for heir.

At last her longings grew so high,
She told her spouse she’d surely die,
Unless the parson would bestow
On her an inch of what you know.

“My dear,” her husband did reply, at care
“Why, this is flat adultery;”

“I know not what it is,” said she,
“But if you won’t with this agree,
“I’m sure I’ll die this very night,
“And never bring the babe to light;
“If you had loved me, at this pinch,
“You’d not have grudged a single inch.”

Away the doting husband went;
The pious parson was content,
And proud that ladies in their grief,
Should send to him to bring relief.

The loving husband was at care
In managing this nice affair,
And, coming in, said to his wife,
“The parson’s come to save your life.”

“‘ ‘Tis very well,” said she, “My dear.”
But when she saw the inch appear,
She cursed and swore that she was wronged; –
“It was not for that inch I longed,
“You stupid blockhead, let me tell ye,
“It was the inch that’s next his belly.”

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of a treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

The Longing Woman, Part One!

August 20, 2014

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).

I very oft have thought why women,
Vexed with green sickness, or when teeming,
Should long for plaister, coals or chalk,
And pine if we their fancies balk.

Yet these things are not much amiss.
Nay, we should humor them in this;
But women, when they are with child,
Have longings sometimes far more wild.
As I shall show you by and by,
If you’ll with patience lend an eye
On what I write.  A Yorkshire Squire,
When years had left him little fire,
Did with a youthful wife engage,
To be the comfort of his age,
For he had threescore winters told;
But see the almighty power of gold.
He saw a neighbor’s charming daughter,
And of her greedy parents sought her.
Her parents, by his riches blinded,
Their daughter’s pleasure little minded;
But Jenny viewed him with disdain,
And wept, but all her tears were vain.

They gravely told her it was folly,
To whine, and be thus melancholy;
They owned indeed the squire was old,
But he was blessed with store of gold,
And they’d take care he should appoint her,
A very comfortable jointure,
That would (when he lay in his tomb)
Soon bring a younger husband home.

At last poor Jenny gave consent,
To do what she could not prevent,
So tho the church they gravely went,
The parson tied them fast for life,
And Jenny was an old man’s wife;
The squire had all the joy he wanted,
And all he asked his Jenny granted;
She answered all his bills at sight,
Whether at morning, noon or night;
But very few demands he made,
And Jenny had but little trade;
But being young, and likewise fair,
She thought it folly to despair.
Fox hunting was the squire’s delight
And seldom did return till night;
But while he thus his sport enjoyed,
His wife was otherwise employed;
Though what she did I cannot tell,
At last the dame began to swell.

. . . to be continued (tomorrow)

This to her spouse she did declare

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of a treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

Easy Warm Up!

August 19, 2014

I’m definitely one of those runners that really doesn’t do much warming up prior to heading out for my runs.   But the September issue of Runner’s World magazine (Sage Rountree) offers some easy suggestions for warming up your muscles while getting into your shoes.  Simply brilliant!

These activities will help to “activate your glutes, warm your leg muscles, and loosen your hip flexors and hamstrings.”  From the looks of it, you may need to have really well-developed balance to accomplish these tasks, but with time I’m sure we can all get there.

1.  Stand tall.
2.  Squat.
3.  Pull on your sock.
4.  Reach for your shoe.
5.  Roll your ankle.
6.  Tie your shoe.

Repeat with the other foot.

Here’s a video that demonstrates these techniques.

Commitment!

August 18, 2014

commitmentdemotivatorHappy Monday!  And, for our campus community, the start of a new semester and the accompanying frenetic pace (at least for the first few weeks).  The key to survival is stress management coupled with endurance — you’ve just got to hang in there and trust that things will settle down eventually.  Here is a demotivator (courtesy of http://www.despair.com) that may offer some level of comfort to those who are unsuccessful in their attempt to control their stress.

Just the Facts!

August 17, 2014

Here is a wonderful infographic that I ran across recently (designed by Kathryn Wheeler and courtesy of Mainstreethost).  It displays ten (10) surprising facts about social media.  Some of these facts were not new to me, but a few were.  Enjoy!  And as a nice tie in to this infographic (as well as the start of a new academic year), here is a link to a presentation made at the Canadian Library Association regarding Social Media in an Academic Library: One Piece of the Puzzle.

10-social-media-facts1

Trivia in the Kitchen, Number Three!

August 16, 2014

Did you know that . . .

the word dessert comes from the French word desservir, which means to clear the table?  In England, the term “pudding” or “afters” is more commonly used for the sweet course at the end of the meal.  The word banquet also comes from a French word for bench.  In Shakespeare’s England, a banquet referred to the serving of fruits and desserts.  My favorite dessert would have to be Key Lime Pie.  Of course, cheesecake (pretty much any flavor) is always a good option as well.   What is your favorite dessert?

 

Cheesecake of the Month – August 2014!

August 15, 2014

This month’s cheesecake is a little more labor-intensive than most, but the effort is worth it!  And, it combines a couple of my favorite things . . . strawberries and champagne!

Strawberries and Champagne Cheesecake

1 cup of Champagne
2 cups of chocolate graham cracker crumbs
2 cups of sugar, divided
1/2 cup of butter, melted
1 cup fresh strawberries, sliced
3 packages (8-ounces each) or cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup of sweetened condensed milk
2 Tablespoons cornstarch
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 egg yolks
20 fresh strawberries, hulled and sliced
1/3 cup of milk chocolate chips
1 teaspoon shortening, divided
1/3 cup of white chocolate chips
1 cup of heavy cream
1/4 cup of confectioner’s sugar

Instructions
1.  Place the Champagne in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.  Cook until the liquid is reduced to about 1/4 of a cup (about 8 minutes).  Cool slightly.

2.  In a large bowl, combine the cracker crumbs, 1/2 cup of sugar, and the butter.  Press onto the bottom and ups the sides of a slightly greased 9″ springform pan and set aside.  Arrange the sliced strawberries over the bottom.

3.  In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and remaining sugar until smooth.  Beat in the sweetened condensed milk, cornstarch and reduced Champagne.  Add the eggs and the egg yolks and beat on low speed until combined.  Pour the mixture over the strawberries and place the pan on a baking sheet.

4.  Bake at 325 degrees for 55-60 minutes or until the center is almost set.  Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes.  Carefully run a knife around the edge of the pan to loosen slightly (but do not yet remove the sides).  Cool an additional hour and then refrigerate overnight.

5.  Remove the sides of the springform pan.  For the garnish/topping, using washed (and completely dried) strawberries, slice and arrange them over the top of the cheesecake.  In a microwave, melt milk chocolate chips and 1/2 teaspoon of the shortening; stir them together until the mixture is smooth.  Drizzle over the cheesecake.  Repeat this process with the white chocolate chips.

6.  In a small bowl, beat the cream until it begins to thicken.  Add the confectioner’s sugar and beat until soft peaks form.  Serve with the cheesecake.

Way Too Much?

August 14, 2014

The Tenth Annual Traverse City Film Festival took place last month . . . and I was fortunate to have been privileged to see a nimiety of movies over the course of the week.  But then again, that’s the whole point of having a film festival in my humble opinion.  This year’s festival had a lot of great movies to choose from and I’m hoping our local independent film theater will get in some of the ones I was unable to catch.

nimiety

nih-MY-uh-tee \noun;

1.  The state of being too much; excess.

Here’s to Libraries, Number Twenty-Eight!

August 13, 2014

Library_28Strahov Monastery Library, Prague, Czechoslovakia.   The Strahov library book collections contain approximately 200,000 volumes, estimated to hold 260,000 works. The books are stored in the two halls and in adjacent depositories. Many of the works are old prints printed between 1501 and 1800. The library’s incunabula (firstprints) (over 1,500 volumes) and manuscripts (approximately 3,000 sheaves) are also valuable and are stored in a special treasury room.  The library has had a rather dicey history but has managed to survive regardless.

“Having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card.”  (Arthur)

Source: photo courtesy of danieldalton.me  (BuzzFeed).


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