Repudiate or Request Earnestly?!

Here are a couple of uncommon words that, while similarly spelled, mean totally different things.  For example (from The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate): “My attorney advised me to abjure any further action that could be construed as harassment of my ex-wife,” and “The judge testily adjured the witness to speak before the jury only in response to questions put to her by her attorneys.”

abjure

\ ab-joo r, jur \, verb;

1.  to renounce, repudiate, or retract, especially with formal solemnity; recant
2.  to renounce or give up under oath; forswear
3.  to avoid or shun.
While . . .

adjure

uhjoo r \, verb
1.  to charge, bind, or command earnestly and solemnly, often under oath or the threat of a penalty.
2.  to entreat or request earnestly or solemnly.
Source: http://www.dictionary.com, and The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.
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