Archive for December, 2017

You Are Special!

December 31, 2017

YouAreSpecial_largeLast month I posted a demotivator on “Affirmation.”  Well, this month’s demotivator (courtesy of www-dot-despair-dot-com), “You Are Special,” seemed a natural follow-up posting.  And yes, if you are in need of this additional affirmation, and if it is a puppy you require for this affirmation, yes, this is a very adorably cute puppy, all white and fluffy, energetic, and probably very lovable.  But let’s remember the last phrase of the demotivator . . . and leave the puppy at home.   Thanks.

Very Illuminating!

December 30, 2017

Lamp

Being a combination art enthusiast/art collector, living in close proximity to art museums as well as being close to a thriving art community or culture has always been important to me.  So, when the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opened in 2011, in Bentonville, Arkansas (just a two-hour drive from Tulsa), I was delighted.  I have visited this museum on numerous occasions and most recently found myself purchasing a small tabletop lamp.  The shade of this lamp is a reproduction of the 1908 painting by Maxfield Parrish etitled “Lantern Bearers” and is currently being displayed at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.   What a joy to be able to bring art (as well as illumination) to a small, but no longer dark, corner of my apartment!

Fun Fact Friday, Number Fifty-Six!

December 29, 2017

Thank goodness for the might cacao bean!  According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the cacao bean is the “seed of a tree native to tropical America, Theobroma cacao (family Sterculiaceae), from which cocoa and chocolate are prepared.”  Did you know that . . .

  • the original recipe for chocolate contained chili powder instead of sugar? (Real Fact #259).
  • vanilla is used to make chocolate? (Real Fact #842).
  • National Chocolate Covered Cherry Day is in six days [January 3rd]?  (Real Fact #1298).
  • chocolate bars and blue denim both originated in Guatemala? (Real Fact #1310).

Source: http://www.snapple.com/real-facts

The Papal Chauffeur!

December 28, 2017

Happy Thursday!  As we “race” to the weekend, here is a funny speeding joke.

While the pope was visiting the USA, he told the driver of his limo that he has the sudden urge to drive. The driver was a good Catholic man, and would not ever dream of questioning the pope’s authority. So the pope sat at the wheel, while his driver got in the back.

They were traveling down the road doing between 70 and 80 mph, when a policeman happened to see them. As he pulled them over, he called in to headquarters reporting a speeding limo, with a VIP inside it.

The chief asked: “Who is in the limo, the mayor?”
The policeman told him: “No, someone more important than the mayor.”

Then the chief asked “Is it the governor?”
The policeman answered: “No, someone more important than the governor.”

The chief finally asked: “Is it the President?”
The policeman answered: “No, someone even more important than the President.”

This made the chief very angry and he bellowed: “Now who is more important than the President?!”
The policeman calmly whispered: “I’ll put it to you this way chief. I don’t know who is this guy, but he has the pope as his chauffeur.”

Source: http://www.workjoke.com

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Seven!

December 27, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin im-, meaning “not,” + pecuniosus, meaning “moneyed, well-off.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Strangely, the only happy branch of our family is the impecunious one, whose members never seem to worry about their apparent lack of cash.”

impecunious

\ im-pi-kyoo-nee-uh s \, adjective;

1. having little or no money; penniless; poor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

College Basketball 2018, Week Seven!

December 26, 2017

A good week for Michigan State!  The Spartans had a big game against Houston Baptist on Monday last week, scoring over one hundred points and pulling away to a forty-five (45) point margin of victory.  Coach Izzo was not overly pleased, and I don’t blame him, with their defense [they allowed too many offensive rebounds] and they continue to amass way too many turnovers.  But a win is still a win.   They followed this up with another victory on Thursday against Long Beach State University and again scored over one hundred points and a forty-two (42) point margin of victory.  Unfortunately, the Big Ten conference currently only has two (2) teams in the AP top-25: Michigan State [#2], and Purdue [#16].  And, with only a week left before conference play begins and there are only three (3) undefeated teams remaining (Villanova [#1], Arizona State [#3], and TCU).

Next up for the Spartans: at home versus Cleveland State on Friday (December 29th) and then another home game against Savannah State on Sunday (December 31st).

The upsets this week included:
North Carolina (#5) losing to unranked Wofford by four (4) points.
Miami (#6) losing to unranked New Mexico State.
Kentucky (#7) losing to unranked UCLA.
Gonzaga (#12) losing to unranked San Diego State by two (2) points.

The close calls this week (won by six points or less [two scores] or in overtime) included:
Texas A&M (#8) defeating unranked Northern Kentucky by six (6) points.
Xavier (#9) defeating unranked Marshall by four (4) points.
Tennessee (#21) defeating unranked Furman by five (5) points.

Top-25 match-ups won by the higher-ranked team included:
There were no top-25 matchups this week.

Merry Christmas 2017!

December 25, 2017

 

Merry Christmas, one and all!

Entering Heaven!

December 24, 2017

Well, it is Christmas Eve, and following the hectic build-up to the Christmas holiday, here is a little humor to hopefully make you smile today (courtesy of “Mirthologist,” Dr. Steven Sultanoff).

Three men died on Christmas Eve and were met by Saint Peter at the pearly gates.

“In honor of this holy season,” Saint Peter said, “You must each possess something that symbolizes  Christmas to get into heaven.”

The first man fumbled through his pockets and pulled out a lighter. He flicked it on. “It represents a candle,” he said. “You may pass through the pearly gates,” Saint Peter said.

The second man reached into his pocket and pulled out a set of keys. He shook them and said, “They’re bells.” Saint Peter said, “You may pass through the pearly gates.”

The third man started searching desperately through his pockets and finally pulled out a pair of women’s glasses.

St. Peter looked at the man with a raised eyebrow and asked, “And just what do those symbolize?”

The man replied, “They’re Carol’s.”

Source: Humor Matters, Dr. Steven M. Sultanoff

Inadvertent Oxymoronica!

December 23, 2017

Inadvertent oxymoronica (defined as two contradictory words used together in one phrase) are those types of observations that happen totally by accident.  Prominent public figures are often the greatest source of these inadvertent quotable faux pas.  Let’s take a look at a few, shall we?

Marion Barry (former Mayor of Washington, DC)
“I am a great mayor; I am an upstanding Christian man; I am an intelligent man; I am a deeply educated man; I am a humble man.”

“There are two kinds of truth.  There are real truths and there are made-up truths.” (Following his drug arrest.)

“Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country.”

John Bowman (District of Columbia City Councilman)
“If crime went down 100 percent, it would still be fifty times higher than it should be.”

George H. W. Bush (former President of the United States)
“I have opinions of my own — strong opinions — but I don’t always agree with them.”

“People say I’m indecisive, but I don’t know about that.”

George W. Bush (former President of the United States)
“I think anybody who doesn’t think I’m smart enough to handle the job is underestimating.”

“For a century and a half now, America and Japan have formed one of the great and enduring alliances of modern times.”

“Presidents, whether things are good or bad, get the blame.  I understand that.”

“there’s no question that the minute I got elected, the storm clouds on the horizon were getting nearly directly overhead.”

“One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected.”

Gerald Ford (former President of the United States)
“If Lincoln were alive today, he’d roll over in his grave.”

Lyndon Johnson (former President of the United States)
“For the first time in history, profits are higher than ever before.”

Richard Nixon (former President of the United States)
We should respect Mexico’s right to chart its own independent course, provided the course is not antagonistic to our interests.”

Dan Quayle (former Vice-President of the United States)
“I believe we are on an irreversible trend toward more freedom and democracy.  But that could change.”

Ronald Reagan (former President of the United States)
“If you could add together the power of prayer of the people just in this room, what would be its megatonnage?”

Josesph McCarthy (former United States Senator)
“That’s the most unheard-of thing I ever heard of.”

Jesse Helms (former United States Senator)
“Democracy used to be a good thing, but it has now got into the wrong hands.”

Barbara Boxer (former United States Senator)
“Those who survived the San Francisco earthquake said, ‘Thank God, I’m still alive.’  But, of course, those who died, their lives will never be the same again.”

Source: oxymoronica by Dr. Mardy Grothe

Fun Fact Friday, Number Fifty-Five!

December 22, 2017

The category for today’s trivial imponderable is “language/initials/mottos.”  Do you know when the English word “pig” was first used as a pejorative term for a police officer?

Sorry, it was not the 1960s during the Civil Rights era.  Rather, in the early nineteenth century, “pig” was used and applied to plainclothes policemen in London.  However, in languages other than English, the term was used much earlier (e.g., when the children of Israel condemned the Roman police authorities long before the nineteenth century).

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong, by Dr. Rod L. Evans.