Archive for the ‘AARP Bulletin’ Category

Long-Term Care!

November 22, 2017

According to a study compiled by the AARP Public Policy Institute, the Commonwealth Fund, and the SCAN Foundation, “more than 9 in 10 Americans want to live at home or with a relative — rather than at a nursing home — for as long as possible.”  According to the study some states would be able to provide this to seniors better than others.  For the states that do it well, it is not only good for the person needing care, but it is generally less expensive to boot.  The states that do this the best include:

  1. Washington
  2. Minnesota
  3. Vermont
  4. Oregon
  5. Alaska

The states that don’t do quite as well include:

46.  Tennessee
47.  Mississippi
48.  Alabama
49.  Kentucky
50.  Indiana

Source: AARP Bulletin, September 2017, p 38.

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How Do You Spend Your Free Time?!

November 2, 2017

Do you believe in “giving back?”  Do you volunteer or donate your time to any organizations?  Seniors certainly do (and they usually have the time to do so) but it does vary from state to state.  Here are the state rankings (highest percentages and lowest percentages) for seniors (65+) who donated their time in the past year.  Oklahoma is safely is the middle of the pack at 24%.

Highest percentages
1.  Utah (46%)
2.  Minnesota (38%)
3.  North Dakota (37%)
3.  Kansas (37%)
5.  South Dakota (36%)
6.  Nebraska (35%)
6.  Idaho (35%)
8.  Vermont (34%)
9.  Wisconsin (33%)
9.  Iowa (33%)

Lowest percentages
1.  Louisiana (16%)
2.  New York (17%)
3.  West Virginia (18%)
3.  Nevada (18%)
5.  Virginia (19%)
5.  Georgia (19%)
5.  Florida (19%)
5.  Rhode Island (19%)
9.  Arkansas (20%)
10.  Texas (21%)
10.  Arizona (21%)
10.  New Jersey (21%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, September 2017, p. 44; America’s Health Rankings: 2017 Senior Report.

Fatal Falls!

April 10, 2017

I’m sure you’ve heard the quip “have a nice trip, I’ll see you next fall” in reference to someone who trips or stumbles.  Unfortunately, for people who are 65 years old (or older) falls can have fatal consequences.  Here are the statistics on the number of fatal falls per 100,000 persons by state for 2015 (top ten states, most and least).  Oklahoma finished just outside the top-ten (#11) with 93.

Most Fatal Falls
1.  Wisconsin (135)
2.  Minnesota (126)
3.  Vermont (122)
4.  South Dakota (116)
5.  New Mexico (105)
6.  Colorado (103)
7.  Oregon (98)
7.  Iowa (98)
7.  Rhode Island (98)
10.  New Hampshire (96)

Least Fatal Falls
1.   Alabama (26)
2.  New Jersey (30)
3.  Delaware (36)
4.  California (39)
5.  Louisiana (40)
5.  Indiana (40)
7.  New York (42)
8.  Kentucky (43)
9.  South Carolina (45)
9.  Georgia (45)

Source: AARP Bulletin, April 2017, p. 44; 24/7 Wall Street (numbers are rounded).

So, Would You Like to Live Longer?!

March 23, 2017

No one knows exactly how long they will live, but who doesn’t want to maximize their time in this world?  Here is a list of fifty (50) ways that if put into practice, could help you extend your life (obviously any medically-related “advice” should be vetted through your personal physician).

  1. Consider extra vitamin D (but too much could also be bad).
  2. Cut back on pain pills (including over-the-counter types)
  3. Please go to bed (get more than six hours per night)
  4. But don’t always go right to sleep (ah, the benefits of sex)
  5. Get (or stay) hitched
  6. Ripeness matters (fully ripe = more benefits)
  7. Say yes to that extra cup (of coffee)
  8. Frozen is fine (fruits and veggies)
  9. Go green (as in tea)
  10. Don’t sweeten with sugar
  11. Eat whole grains
  12. Spice it up (chili peppers)
  13. Drink whole milk (dairy fat can be good)
  14. Just add water (stay hydrated)
  15. Be food safe (keep and store food correctly)
  16. Eat less (stop when you feel full)
  17. End the day’s eating by 9:00 PM
  18. Eat your veggies
  19. Eat like the Greeks (i.e., Mediterranean diet)
  20. Or live like the Amish (tend to live longer with less hospitalization)
  21. Drink less
  22. Save your pennies (higher income = live longer)
  23. Or move to one of these states (California, New York, Vermont)
  24. Ponder a ponderosa (experience a sense of awe; nature, music, art)
  25. Go nuts (10 grams a day)
  26. Find your purpose (have something to look forward to)
  27. Embrace your faith
  28. Vacation or else (take some time off)
  29. Consider mountain life (live in higher altitude)
  30. Get a friend with four legs (pet ownership)
  31. Keep watching lol cat videos (laughter is important)
  32. Get social (reduce lonliness)
  33. Watch your grandkids
  34. Try to stay out of the hospital
  35. Monitor yourself (don’t wait for annual checkup)
  36. Visit the hardware store (monitor carbon monoxide, radon, and lead levels)
  37. You need to read (30 minutes per day)
  38. Toss that rug (risk for fall)
  39. Practice home fire drills (know what to do in advance, have a plan)
  40. Find a woman doctor
  41. Make peace with family
  42. Take the stairs – every day
  43. Trade in ol’ Bessie (news car all have high-tech safety features)
  44. Beware the high-tech dash (distracted driving)
  45. And drive less
  46. Better yet, walk (exercise best prescription for long life)
  47. Just not in the street
  48. And go a little faster  (exceed one meter per second)
  49. Get fidgety (don’t “sit” too long)
  50. Read the AARP Bulletin (shameless plug)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 23-30.

The Cost of Care!

March 16, 2017

Judging from the below data re: the cost of nursing home/long-term care, it might behoove me to remain in the State of Oklahoma in my retirement years.  Here’s a list of the states where these costs are least expensive as well as most expensive (median daily cost for long-term care in a semi-private room in 2016) . . .

Most Expensive:
1. Alaska ($800)
2. Connecticut ($407)
3. Massachusetts ($370)
4. New York ($361)
5. North Dakota ($359)
6. Hawaii ($355)
7. District of Columbia ($333)
8. New Jersey ($325)
9. New Hampshire ($320)
10. Delaware ($315)

Least Expensive:
1. OKLAHOMA ($145)
2. Texas ($148)
3. Missouri ($156)
4. Louisiana ($160)
5. Arkansas ($161)
6. Kansas ($171)
7. Iowa ($182)
8. Illinois ($184)
9. Nebraska ($185)
9. Utah ($185)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 44 (from Genworth 2016 Cost of Care Survey)

No Bank Account?!

January 14, 2017

While I don’t remember how old I was when I did it, opening my first savings account at the bank was a big deal.  Apparently, there are many households throughout the country that do not rely on banks at all and have neither a checking nor a savings account.  Here are the state rankings showing the highest and lowest percentages of households in which no one had a checking or savings account (according to the 2015 FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households).

Lowest percentage
1. Vermont (1.5%)
2. New Hampshire (1.8%)
3. Maine (2.3%)
4. Hawaii (2.4%)
4. Wyoming (2.4%)
6. North Dakota (3.0%)
7. Wisconsin (3.4%)
7. Minnesota (3.4%)
9. Alaska (3.5%)
10. Idaho (3.6%)

Highest percentage
1. Louisiana (14.0%)
2. Mississippi (12.6%)
3. Alabama (12.5%)
4. Georgia (11.9%)
5. Oklahoma (11.0%)
6. Tennessee (10.8%)
7. Arkansas (9.7%)
8. Texas (9.4%)
8. New Mexico (9.4%)
10. Kentucky (9.0%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Databank USA, January-February 2017.

 

“Party On, Wayne . . . !”

December 31, 2016

On this, the eve of the new year, what better quotation to reference than the title of this post from the epic comedy “Wayne’s World” (1992).  Let this also serve as a reminder though that as you find yourself partying this evening . . . exercise common sense and moderation, and if you do overdo it on the consumption of alcohol, don’t even think about driving.

Allow me to also share with you the list of the states with the most and the least number (percentage) of senior adults (age 65+) who report either binge drinking or chronic drinking.  But before we get to the list, how about definitions of “binge” and “chronic” drinking?

Binge drinking is defined as five (5) or more drinks on one occasion within the last month (for men) or four (4) or more drinks (for women).

Chronic drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day (for men) or one drink per day (for women).

Highest percentage
1. Wisconsin (11.1%)
2. District of Columbia (9/8%)
3. Nevada (9.2%)
4. Hawaii (9.1%)
5. Oregon (9.0%)
6. Florida (8.9%)
6. Alaska (8.9%)
8. Washington (8.6%)
9. Vermont (8.5%)
9. California (8.5%)

Lowest percentage
1. Tennessee (2.9%)
2. Mississippi (3.2%)
3. West Virginia (3.3%)
4. Oklahoma (3.4%)
4. Utah (3.4%)
6. Kentucky (4.0%)
7. Alabama (4.3%)
8. Missouri (4.7%)
9. Kansas (4.9%)
9. Georgia (4.9%)
9. North Carolina (4.9%)
9. Indiana (4.9%)

Source: AARP Bulletin (December 2016) and the 2016 “America’s Health Rankings Senior Report.”

Ah, the Monthly Mortgage!

December 10, 2016

Obviously we all know how hard we work and how long it takes for us to individually put in enough hours to pay our mortgages.  But do you know how you compare to others in your state?  Around the country?  This month’s issue of the AARP Bulletin has the comparisons by state of the average number of hours you need to work to cover your monthly mortgage.

Most hours
1. Hawaii (88)
2. District of Columbia (83)
3. California (78)
4. Colorado (67)
4. Oregon (67)

Least hours
1. Ohio (31)
2. Michigan (32)
3. Indiana (33)
4. Iowa (34)
4. Missouri (34)
4. Kansas (34)

Source: AARP Bulletin and gobankingrates.com

Where’s the Health Care?

October 19, 2016

Have you ever wondered which states offer the best “home health care?”  Well, wonder no more.  In the October 2016 issue of the AARP Bulletin they provide a state by state comparison of the number of personal and home health aides per 1,000 adults 75 years of age or older.

Highest number:
1. Washington, DC (302)
2. Hawaii (279)
3. Minnesota (268)
4. New York (242)
5.  New Mexico (211)

Lowest  number:
1. Florida (29)
2. South Dakota (49)
3. Mississippi (53)
4. Alabama (54)
5. Kentucky (57)

Source: 2016 America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, United Health Foundation (rounded to the closest number).

The Right to Bear Arms!

September 21, 2016

Want to know how your state rates when it comes to the percentage of adults who own guns (data for 2013)?   The September issue of the AARP Bulletin provided a map comparing all of the states (source: Injury Prevention).  I’m not exactly sure how this was measured (Legally owned? Registered/permitted?) , so I’m reticent to totally accept the accuracy of these percentages . . . but for purposes of the conversation, a starting point.  I’m wondering if Illinois’ percentage failed to include the city of Chicago?

Highest to Lowest
1. Alaska (61.7%)
2. Arkansas (57.9%)
3. Idaho (56.9%)
4. West Virginia (54.2%)
5. Wyoming (53.8%)
6. Montana (52.3%)
7. Alabama (48.9%)
8. North Dakota (47.9%)
9.  Hawaii (45.1%)
10. Louisiana (44.5%)
11. South Carolina (44.4%)
12. Mississippi (42.8%)
13. Kentucky (42.4%)
14. Tennessee (39.4%)
15. Nevada (37.5%)
16. Minnesota (36.7%)
17. Texas (35.7%)
18. South Dakota (35.0%)
19. Wisconsin (34.7%)
20. Colorado (34.3%)
21. Iowa (33.8%)
21. Indiana (33.8%)
23. Florida (32.5%)
24. Arizona (32.3%)
25. Kansas (32.2%)
26. Utah (31.9%)
27. Georgia (31.6%)
28. Oklahoma (31.2%)
29. Virginia (29.3%)
30. Michigan (28.8%)
30. Vermont (28.8%)
32. North Carolina (28.7%)
33. Washington (27.7%)
34. Missouri (27.1%)
34. Pennsylvania (27.1%)
36. Oregon (26.6%)
37. Illinois (26.2%)
38. District of Columbia (25.9%)
39. Maine (22.6%)
39. Massachusetts (22.6%)
41. Maryland (20.7%)
42. California (20.1%)
43. Nebraska (19.8%)
44. Ohio (19.6%)
45. Connecticut (16.6%)
46. New Hampshire (14.4%)
47. New Jersey (11.3%)
48. New York (10.3)
49. Rhode Island (5.8%)
50. Delaware (5.2%)