Archive for the ‘AARP Bulletin’ Category

No Bank Account?!

January 14, 2017

While I don’t remember how old I was when I did it, opening my first savings account at the bank was a big deal.  Apparently, there are many households throughout the country that do not rely on banks at all and have neither a checking nor a savings account.  Here are the state rankings showing the highest and lowest percentages of households in which no one had a checking or savings account (according to the 2015 FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households).

Lowest percentage
1. Vermont (1.5%)
2. New Hampshire (1.8%)
3. Maine (2.3%)
4. Hawaii (2.4%)
4. Wyoming (2.4%)
6. North Dakota (3.0%)
7. Wisconsin (3.4%)
7. Minnesota (3.4%)
9. Alaska (3.5%)
10. Idaho (3.6%)

Highest percentage
1. Louisiana (14.0%)
2. Mississippi (12.6%)
3. Alabama (12.5%)
4. Georgia (11.9%)
5. Oklahoma (11.0%)
6. Tennessee (10.8%)
7. Arkansas (9.7%)
8. Texas (9.4%)
8. New Mexico (9.4%)
10. Kentucky (9.0%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Databank USA, January-February 2017.

 

“Party On, Wayne . . . !”

December 31, 2016

On this, the eve of the new year, what better quotation to reference than the title of this post from the epic comedy “Wayne’s World” (1992).  Let this also serve as a reminder though that as you find yourself partying this evening . . . exercise common sense and moderation, and if you do overdo it on the consumption of alcohol, don’t even think about driving.

Allow me to also share with you the list of the states with the most and the least number (percentage) of senior adults (age 65+) who report either binge drinking or chronic drinking.  But before we get to the list, how about definitions of “binge” and “chronic” drinking?

Binge drinking is defined as five (5) or more drinks on one occasion within the last month (for men) or four (4) or more drinks (for women).

Chronic drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day (for men) or one drink per day (for women).

Highest percentage
1. Wisconsin (11.1%)
2. District of Columbia (9/8%)
3. Nevada (9.2%)
4. Hawaii (9.1%)
5. Oregon (9.0%)
6. Florida (8.9%)
6. Alaska (8.9%)
8. Washington (8.6%)
9. Vermont (8.5%)
9. California (8.5%)

Lowest percentage
1. Tennessee (2.9%)
2. Mississippi (3.2%)
3. West Virginia (3.3%)
4. Oklahoma (3.4%)
4. Utah (3.4%)
6. Kentucky (4.0%)
7. Alabama (4.3%)
8. Missouri (4.7%)
9. Kansas (4.9%)
9. Georgia (4.9%)
9. North Carolina (4.9%)
9. Indiana (4.9%)

Source: AARP Bulletin (December 2016) and the 2016 “America’s Health Rankings Senior Report.”

Ah, the Monthly Mortgage!

December 10, 2016

Obviously we all know how hard we work and how long it takes for us to individually put in enough hours to pay our mortgages.  But do you know how you compare to others in your state?  Around the country?  This month’s issue of the AARP Bulletin has the comparisons by state of the average number of hours you need to work to cover your monthly mortgage.

Most hours
1. Hawaii (88)
2. District of Columbia (83)
3. California (78)
4. Colorado (67)
4. Oregon (67)

Least hours
1. Ohio (31)
2. Michigan (32)
3. Indiana (33)
4. Iowa (34)
4. Missouri (34)
4. Kansas (34)

Source: AARP Bulletin and gobankingrates.com

Where’s the Health Care?

October 19, 2016

Have you ever wondered which states offer the best “home health care?”  Well, wonder no more.  In the October 2016 issue of the AARP Bulletin they provide a state by state comparison of the number of personal and home health aides per 1,000 adults 75 years of age or older.

Highest number:
1. Washington, DC (302)
2. Hawaii (279)
3. Minnesota (268)
4. New York (242)
5.  New Mexico (211)

Lowest  number:
1. Florida (29)
2. South Dakota (49)
3. Mississippi (53)
4. Alabama (54)
5. Kentucky (57)

Source: 2016 America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, United Health Foundation (rounded to the closest number).

The Right to Bear Arms!

September 21, 2016

Want to know how your state rates when it comes to the percentage of adults who own guns (data for 2013)?   The September issue of the AARP Bulletin provided a map comparing all of the states (source: Injury Prevention).  I’m not exactly sure how this was measured (Legally owned? Registered/permitted?) , so I’m reticent to totally accept the accuracy of these percentages . . . but for purposes of the conversation, a starting point.  I’m wondering if Illinois’ percentage failed to include the city of Chicago?

Highest to Lowest
1. Alaska (61.7%)
2. Arkansas (57.9%)
3. Idaho (56.9%)
4. West Virginia (54.2%)
5. Wyoming (53.8%)
6. Montana (52.3%)
7. Alabama (48.9%)
8. North Dakota (47.9%)
9.  Hawaii (45.1%)
10. Louisiana (44.5%)
11. South Carolina (44.4%)
12. Mississippi (42.8%)
13. Kentucky (42.4%)
14. Tennessee (39.4%)
15. Nevada (37.5%)
16. Minnesota (36.7%)
17. Texas (35.7%)
18. South Dakota (35.0%)
19. Wisconsin (34.7%)
20. Colorado (34.3%)
21. Iowa (33.8%)
21. Indiana (33.8%)
23. Florida (32.5%)
24. Arizona (32.3%)
25. Kansas (32.2%)
26. Utah (31.9%)
27. Georgia (31.6%)
28. Oklahoma (31.2%)
29. Virginia (29.3%)
30. Michigan (28.8%)
30. Vermont (28.8%)
32. North Carolina (28.7%)
33. Washington (27.7%)
34. Missouri (27.1%)
34. Pennsylvania (27.1%)
36. Oregon (26.6%)
37. Illinois (26.2%)
38. District of Columbia (25.9%)
39. Maine (22.6%)
39. Massachusetts (22.6%)
41. Maryland (20.7%)
42. California (20.1%)
43. Nebraska (19.8%)
44. Ohio (19.6%)
45. Connecticut (16.6%)
46. New Hampshire (14.4%)
47. New Jersey (11.3%)
48. New York (10.3)
49. Rhode Island (5.8%)
50. Delaware (5.2%)

Your Risk of Stroke!

August 28, 2016

Interestingly enough, the states with the lowest stroke mortality rate (for 2014) seem to be clustered predominantly in the northeast United States, while the states with the highest rate are clustered predominantly in the south.  Hmm, very curious indeed.  These are the number of deaths per 100,000 people based on information obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics.  Here are the top ten and the bottom ten.  Yikes, Oklahoma is in the grouping with the highest rates of stroke!

Lowest rates
1. Rhode Island (25.6)
2. New York (26.1)
3. Connecticut (26.3)
4. New Mexico (28.3)
5. Massachusetts (28.7)
6. New Hampshire (28.9)
7. Wyoming (30.2)
8. New Jersey (31.4)
9. Vermont (31.7)
10. Hawaii (32.3)

Highest rates
1. Mississippi (48.8)
2. Alabama (48.3)
3. Tennessee (45.8)
4. Louisiana (45.6)
5. Arkansas (45.4)
6. West Virginia (45.3)
7. South Carolina (44.2)
8. Oklahoma (43.0)
8. North Carolina (43.0)
10. Georgia (42.6)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Databank USA, July-August 2016, p. 40 (National Center for Health Statistics).

Where Are The Workers?!

June 25, 2016

When it comes to full-time employees, according to a recent Gallup survey, less than half of the American adult population (age 18+) worked at least 30 hours a week in 2015.  Only four States exceeded the 50% threshold, everyone else was below 50% (Oklahoma came in at 43.1% — hmm, closer to the bottom than to the top.)  Here’s the five highest states (of percentage of adults employed full-time) and the five lowest states.

Highest percentage of adults working full-time
1. District of Columbia (57.0%)
2. North Dakota (51.5%)
3. Hawaii (50.6%)
4. Nebraska (50.3%)
5. Minnesota (49.5%)

Lowest percentage of adults working full-time
1.  West Virginia (38.3%)
2. New Mexico (39.2%)
3. Alabama (39.2%)
4. Mississippi (40.5%)
5. Montana (40.6%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, May 2016

Workplace Retirement Plans!

April 12, 2016

So, are you ready for retirement?  Have you saved sufficiently?  Do you work for an employer who has an employer-based account?  In the April issue of AARP Bulletin, there was a state-by-state comparison of the percentage of workers with employer-based accounts.  These percentages range from a high of 61% to a low of 38%.  Oklahoma fell right in the middle at 50%.  Here are the states with the five highest and the five lowest percentages of employer-based accounts:

Highest percentage
1.  Wisconsin (61%)
1.  Minnesota (61%)
3.  North Dakota (59%)
3.  Iowa (59%)
5.  New Hampshire (58%)
5.  Connecticut (58%)

Lowest percentage
1.  Florida (38%)
2.  Nevada (39%)
3.  Arizona (41%)
3.  New Mexico (41%)
5.  Texas (42%)

Source: PEW Charitable Trusts, data for full-time private-sector workers ages 18-64.

Keep on Working!

February 5, 2016

There has been a trend in recent years for people to keep working well past what was considered the normal age for retirement (thank the economy, inflation, lack of sufficient savings, etc.).  Here is a breakdown of the states with the most and least Americans who are over 55 years of age and still in the workforce.

Highest percentage
1.  North Dakota (49.7%)
2. Vermont (48.3%)
3. Alaska (46.3%)
3. Nebraska (46.3%)
5. Kansas (45.9%)
6. South Dakota (45.6%)
7. New Hampshire (45.2%)
8. Iowa (44.9%)
9. Wyoming (43.5%)
10. Maryland (43.0%)

Lowest percentage
1. Arkansas (30.1%)
2. Mississippi (30.3%)
3. Alabama (30.9%)
4. West Virginia (31.4%)
5. South Carolina (31.8%)
6. Arizona (33.5%)
7. Kentucky (33.6%)
8. Michigan (33.9%)
9. Tennessee (34.0%)
10. Nevada (34.8%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Jan/Feb issue, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

That’s a Lot of Tax!

January 11, 2016

I’m not a smoker, but the tax on cigarettes can vary greatly from state to state (who knew?).  Here are the states with the highest and lowest cigarette tax (per pack as of October 7, 2015).

Highest tax
1. Pennsylvania ($4.35)
2. Rhode Island ($3.75)
3. Connecticut ($3.65)
4. Massachusetts ($3.51)
5. Hawaii ($3.20)

Lowest tax
5.  North Carolina ($0.45)
4. North Dakota ($0.44)
3. Georgia ($0.37)
2. Virginia ($0.30)
1. Missouri ($0.17)

Source Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (rates do not include some local taxes or fees); and, AARP Bulletin, December 2015 issue.