Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Twisted Glass!

July 27, 2017

curly

Earlier this month I availed myself of the opportunity to make the trip to Bentonville, Arkansas, to visit the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art  . . . and their featured exhibit of the art of Dale Chihuly.  Simply marvelous.  There was an inside exhibit (in the Gallery) as well as an outdoor exhibit (in the Forest).  If you are at all interested, there are still a few weeks left to catch the gallery exhibitSteps (it runs through August 14th); the forest exhibit will continue through November 13th.

Due to the numerous pieces that were “orange,” I’m going to claim a “kindred spirit” connection to Mr. Chihuly!  I just loved the quotation on the outdoor staircase leading to the “in the forest” portion of the exhibit: “glass is the most magical of all materials.”  And, after witnessing the creativity and genius of Dale Chihuly and the representation of his art in glass, I couldn’t agree more.

 

Nighthawks!

July 22, 2017

Nighthawks_by_Edward_Hopper_1942Happy Birthday Edward Hopper!  (Born 135 years ago in Nyack, New York).  “Nighthawks” (pictured here) is by far my favorite of Edward Hopper’s paintings.

Hopper studied under Robert Henri and William Merritt Chase and has been associated with the New Realism Art Movement (American Realism).  He was influenced by numerous artists: Robert Henri, William Merritt Chase, Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Childe Hassam,  as well as the Impressionism Movement; Hopper in turn influenced such notable artists as Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and Jim Dine.  My favorite quotation by Hopper:

“If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.”

Tumbling Torrent!

July 17, 2017

Rushing TorrentHere is a second piece that I was able to acquire from Charles R. Murphy during his spring 2017 painting potluck.  The title: Tumbling Torrent; the artist: Charles R. Murphy; the medium: watercolor; the genre: impressionistic.  This particular piece had an added bonus . . . on the reverse of the painting, there seemed to be a “study” of trees (Check back later.  I’ll post this image in the not too distant future.)

What a Tree-t!

July 16, 2017

PAM-TreeHere is another exceptional work of art that I discovered last month while at the Phoenix Art Museum.  This sculpture, by Rebecca Campbell, is entitled “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me?” and “is composed of a tree wrapped in black velvet, standing in a base of salt and with tiny, windex-filled glass birds sitting on its branches” (from the media release).  Campbell explained that her inspiration for the sculpture came from seeing a group of burned trees against a stark snowy background.

Here’s a link to an interview with the artist.

Fancy Knots!

July 5, 2017

SamuraiKnotA coupe of weeks ago, while in Phoenix, Arizona, attending the Annual Conference of the Special Libraries Association (SLA), I was able to stay one extra day (post-conference) to explore a bit and visit family (my nephew and his fiancée) and dropped in on the Phoenix Art Museum.  There were several wonderful exhibits, including a collection of Samurai armor.  The armor seems to have been held in place using cords with a very intricate (and decorative) knotting convention (or at least for show or display purposes).   Very cool indeed (and a most beautiful color as well).

Was Gaudí Gaudy?!

June 25, 2017
Sagrada Familia nave roof

Ceiling of the nave

In my opinion, no, but very artistic.  Happy Birthday Antoni!  On this the anniversary of Antoni Gaudí‘s birth, let’s take a moment to honor and acknowledge one of the most famous Spanish architects who spent more than 40 years designing the Temple of the Sagrada Familia (most visited attraction and Gaudí’s most famous ) in Barcelona, Spain.  And, while the Temple is not yet complete (the anticipated completion date is in 2026 — the centenary of Gaudí’s death), it does not diminish this great accomplishment.  I was privileged to have been able to visit Barcelona (in 1998 or 1999) and got to see this structure firsthand.  Truly remarkable.

A Stitching Sampler!

June 17, 2017

Happy Saturday!  Here Stitching Sampleris a unique piece that has more than its share of sentimental value.  This is a needlework stitching sampler that was done by my grandmother (Naomi Peplinski) and just recently gifted to me by my late aunt (Shirley Withbroe) who just happened to love anything strawberry.  A wonderful keepsake that I will treasure forever.

The Child’s Bath!

May 25, 2017

Mary_Cassatt_-_The_Child's_Bath_-_Google_Art_ProjectOn this the birthday of Mary Cassatt (American painter), here is one of her oil paintings, “The Child’s Bath” (from the late Nineteenth Century) that is currently on display at the Art Institute of Chicago.    Cassatt spent most of her adult life in France and was eventually invited to join “the group of independent artists known as the impressionists.”  (from The Art Story Biography).  She was connected to both impressionism as well as realism during the course of her career and was influenced by Edouard Manet, Thomas Couture, Gustave Courbet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir; among her friends: Edgar Degas, Camille Pissarro, and Berthe Morisot.  Cassatt herself influenced fellow painters Degas and Morisot as well as Lucy Bacon and also had an impact on the Post-Impressionism and Feminist Art movements.

Sparks of Life!

May 17, 2017

Sparks of LifeHere is a piece that I acquired during a recent exhibit (March) held in the Visitors Center Gallery on the Broken Arrow campus of Northeastern State University.  The title: Sparks of Life; the artist: Duane Duvall; the medium: heavy acrylic; the genre: abstract.  I now have several pieces by Duane and am officially a member of the “family of collectors.”  I couldn’t be happier with my latest acquisitions (just a hint of my favorite color [orange] lol).

The Rooster!

April 17, 2017

roosterHere is on of my most recent acquisitions that I purchased “sight unseen.”    Charles Murphy once again offered his spring “painting potluck” where collectors were able to acquire original works of art for a ridiculously inexpensive price (and naturally, I ordered more than one).  The way it works: you send in your money and the artist picks out an original watercolor from his inventory and mails it back to you.  Kind of like a blind date, only with a purchased work of art.  The original painting (watercolor) is always valued at much more than the price you pay.  I’ve been collecting works by Charles for several years now and I have yet to be disappointed by my potluck purchases.  Thank you Charles!