Archive for the ‘Statistics’ Category

Let’s Not Be Idle!

May 22, 2017

Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial for a variety of reasons . . .

  • Control Your Weight.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.
  • Reduce your risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Some Cancers.
  • Strengthen Your Bones and Muscles.
  • Improve Your Mental Health and Mood.

So, how active are you?  Here are the best and the worst states by the percentage of people who are over 50 years of age who engage in NO physical activity whatsoever . . .

States with the lowest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Colorado (18%)
2. Oregon (20%)
2. Washington (20%)
4. Idaho (21%)
5. Vermont (22%)

States with the highest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Arkansas (39%)
2. Mississippi (36%)
3. Oklahoma (35%)
3. Kentucky (35%)
4. Louisiana (34%)
4. West Virginia (34%)

Source: May 2017 AARP Bulletin; 2014 survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; numbers are rounded; respondents reported activity level over the previous month.

The Cost of Care!

March 16, 2017

Judging from the below data re: the cost of nursing home/long-term care, it might behoove me to remain in the State of Oklahoma in my retirement years.  Here’s a list of the states where these costs are least expensive as well as most expensive (median daily cost for long-term care in a semi-private room in 2016) . . .

Most Expensive:
1. Alaska ($800)
2. Connecticut ($407)
3. Massachusetts ($370)
4. New York ($361)
5. North Dakota ($359)
6. Hawaii ($355)
7. District of Columbia ($333)
8. New Jersey ($325)
9. New Hampshire ($320)
10. Delaware ($315)

Least Expensive:
1. OKLAHOMA ($145)
2. Texas ($148)
3. Missouri ($156)
4. Louisiana ($160)
5. Arkansas ($161)
6. Kansas ($171)
7. Iowa ($182)
8. Illinois ($184)
9. Nebraska ($185)
9. Utah ($185)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 44 (from Genworth 2016 Cost of Care Survey)

“Party On, Wayne . . . !”

December 31, 2016

On this, the eve of the new year, what better quotation to reference than the title of this post from the epic comedy “Wayne’s World” (1992).  Let this also serve as a reminder though that as you find yourself partying this evening . . . exercise common sense and moderation, and if you do overdo it on the consumption of alcohol, don’t even think about driving.

Allow me to also share with you the list of the states with the most and the least number (percentage) of senior adults (age 65+) who report either binge drinking or chronic drinking.  But before we get to the list, how about definitions of “binge” and “chronic” drinking?

Binge drinking is defined as five (5) or more drinks on one occasion within the last month (for men) or four (4) or more drinks (for women).

Chronic drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day (for men) or one drink per day (for women).

Highest percentage
1. Wisconsin (11.1%)
2. District of Columbia (9/8%)
3. Nevada (9.2%)
4. Hawaii (9.1%)
5. Oregon (9.0%)
6. Florida (8.9%)
6. Alaska (8.9%)
8. Washington (8.6%)
9. Vermont (8.5%)
9. California (8.5%)

Lowest percentage
1. Tennessee (2.9%)
2. Mississippi (3.2%)
3. West Virginia (3.3%)
4. Oklahoma (3.4%)
4. Utah (3.4%)
6. Kentucky (4.0%)
7. Alabama (4.3%)
8. Missouri (4.7%)
9. Kansas (4.9%)
9. Georgia (4.9%)
9. North Carolina (4.9%)
9. Indiana (4.9%)

Source: AARP Bulletin (December 2016) and the 2016 “America’s Health Rankings Senior Report.”

Ah, the Monthly Mortgage!

December 10, 2016

Obviously we all know how hard we work and how long it takes for us to individually put in enough hours to pay our mortgages.  But do you know how you compare to others in your state?  Around the country?  This month’s issue of the AARP Bulletin has the comparisons by state of the average number of hours you need to work to cover your monthly mortgage.

Most hours
1. Hawaii (88)
2. District of Columbia (83)
3. California (78)
4. Colorado (67)
4. Oregon (67)

Least hours
1. Ohio (31)
2. Michigan (32)
3. Indiana (33)
4. Iowa (34)
4. Missouri (34)
4. Kansas (34)

Source: AARP Bulletin and gobankingrates.com

Happy Thanksgiving 2016!

November 24, 2016

Thanksgiving officially became a holiday 153 years ago (President Abraham Lincoln proclamation, October 3, 1863, declaring the last Thursday of November as the holiday).  I know you are curious and just dying to know some of the facts that follow, so sit back and relax, here is a list of some truly trivial Thanksgiving facts . . . Thanksgiving by the numbers:

  • 4 places as well as 11 townships in the U.S. with “Turkey” in their name
    • Turkey Creek village (Louisiana)
    • Turkey city (Texas)
    • Turkey Creek (Arizona)
    • Turkey town (North Carolina)
  • 7 places or townships with “Cranberry” in their name
  • 33 counties, places, and townships with “Plymouth” in their name.
  • 65,975 = the number of grocery stores in the U.S. (2014)
  • 3,109 = the number of bakeries in the U.S. (2014)
  • 2,798 = the number of fruits and vegetables markets in the U.S. (2014)
  • 243 million = the number of turkeys raised in the U.S. (2016)
    • 44 million (Minnesota)
    • 33 million (North Carolina)
    • 26 million (Arkansas)
    • 20 million (Indiana)
    • 19.7 million (Missouri)
    • 17 million (Virginia)
  • $19.3 million = value of live turkeys imported to the U.S. — mostly from Canada (2015)
  • 850 million pounds = cranberries produced in the U.S.  — 521 million in Wisconsin (2016)
  • 3.1 billion pounds = sweet potatoes produced in the U.S. (2015)

Source: U.S. Census, https://www.census.gov/newsroom/facts-for-features/2016/cb16-ff19.html

Not Just For Kids!

October 25, 2016

Halloween, which is just around the corner, used to be a holiday primarily for the kids — costumes, trick or treating, and lots of candy. However, lately, adults are becoming the dominant consumers for this holiday — grownup parties and events, home decor, and costumes (adults, children, and pets).

According to the National Retail Federation, here were the top spending categories:

  • Candy – $2.1 billion
  • Home Decor – $1.9 billion
  • Adult Costumes – $1.2 billion
  • Child Costumes – $950 million
  • Pet Costumes – $350 million

So, Happy Halloween (next week) one and all.  Party on, Wayne!

Source AARP: The Magazine, October/November issue.

Did You Know . . . !

October 13, 2016

For those of you with inquisitive minds who “just want to know” some trivial facts about Google, here is an infographic that will provide you with fifty-five such facts about Google of which you may not have been previously aware.  Enjoy!

55_Google_Facts

The Right to Bear Arms!

September 21, 2016

Want to know how your state rates when it comes to the percentage of adults who own guns (data for 2013)?   The September issue of the AARP Bulletin provided a map comparing all of the states (source: Injury Prevention).  I’m not exactly sure how this was measured (Legally owned? Registered/permitted?) , so I’m reticent to totally accept the accuracy of these percentages . . . but for purposes of the conversation, a starting point.  I’m wondering if Illinois’ percentage failed to include the city of Chicago?

Highest to Lowest
1. Alaska (61.7%)
2. Arkansas (57.9%)
3. Idaho (56.9%)
4. West Virginia (54.2%)
5. Wyoming (53.8%)
6. Montana (52.3%)
7. Alabama (48.9%)
8. North Dakota (47.9%)
9.  Hawaii (45.1%)
10. Louisiana (44.5%)
11. South Carolina (44.4%)
12. Mississippi (42.8%)
13. Kentucky (42.4%)
14. Tennessee (39.4%)
15. Nevada (37.5%)
16. Minnesota (36.7%)
17. Texas (35.7%)
18. South Dakota (35.0%)
19. Wisconsin (34.7%)
20. Colorado (34.3%)
21. Iowa (33.8%)
21. Indiana (33.8%)
23. Florida (32.5%)
24. Arizona (32.3%)
25. Kansas (32.2%)
26. Utah (31.9%)
27. Georgia (31.6%)
28. Oklahoma (31.2%)
29. Virginia (29.3%)
30. Michigan (28.8%)
30. Vermont (28.8%)
32. North Carolina (28.7%)
33. Washington (27.7%)
34. Missouri (27.1%)
34. Pennsylvania (27.1%)
36. Oregon (26.6%)
37. Illinois (26.2%)
38. District of Columbia (25.9%)
39. Maine (22.6%)
39. Massachusetts (22.6%)
41. Maryland (20.7%)
42. California (20.1%)
43. Nebraska (19.8%)
44. Ohio (19.6%)
45. Connecticut (16.6%)
46. New Hampshire (14.4%)
47. New Jersey (11.3%)
48. New York (10.3)
49. Rhode Island (5.8%)
50. Delaware (5.2%)

Fun Fact Friday!

September 16, 2016

The fun fact for today . . . did you know that 150,000 gallons of water pour over the Niagara Falls per second?

To add some more fun facts to the mix (courtesy of the October 2016 issue of Runner’s World) that will tie in with running as well as the upcoming Niagara Falls International Marathon (October 30, 2016).

  • .32 = the average amount of water, in gallons, that a runner sweats out per hour.
  • 4:19 = the median time it takes to finish a marathon.
  • 1.38 = the approximate amount of sweat, in gallons, that a runner perspires in the course of running a marathon.
  • 721 = the number of finishers at the 2015 Niagara Falls International Marathon.
  • 995 = the number of gallons sweated out at the 2015 Niagara Falls International Marathon.
  • 151 = the number of years the race needs to be held before marathon runners sweat out one second’s worth of  Niagara Falls’ output.

Your Risk of Stroke!

August 28, 2016

Interestingly enough, the states with the lowest stroke mortality rate (for 2014) seem to be clustered predominantly in the northeast United States, while the states with the highest rate are clustered predominantly in the south.  Hmm, very curious indeed.  These are the number of deaths per 100,000 people based on information obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics.  Here are the top ten and the bottom ten.  Yikes, Oklahoma is in the grouping with the highest rates of stroke!

Lowest rates
1. Rhode Island (25.6)
2. New York (26.1)
3. Connecticut (26.3)
4. New Mexico (28.3)
5. Massachusetts (28.7)
6. New Hampshire (28.9)
7. Wyoming (30.2)
8. New Jersey (31.4)
9. Vermont (31.7)
10. Hawaii (32.3)

Highest rates
1. Mississippi (48.8)
2. Alabama (48.3)
3. Tennessee (45.8)
4. Louisiana (45.6)
5. Arkansas (45.4)
6. West Virginia (45.3)
7. South Carolina (44.2)
8. Oklahoma (43.0)
8. North Carolina (43.0)
10. Georgia (42.6)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Databank USA, July-August 2016, p. 40 (National Center for Health Statistics).