Archive for the ‘Vocabulary’ Category

Let Us Not Disparage!

November 21, 2018

The epitome of dirty politics  . . . the use of a canard.  “Before the election, the politician invented a canard about his rival and shared it with the media.”

canard

\ kuhnahrdFrench kanar \, noun;

  1. false or baseless, usually derogatory story, report, or rumor.
  2. Cookeryduck intended or used for food.
  3. Aeronautics.
    1. an airplane that has its horizontal stabilizer and elevators located forward of tthe wing.
    2. Also called canard wing.one of two small lifting wings located in front of the  main wings.
    3. an early airplane having a pusher engine with the rudder and elevator  assembly in front of the wings.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Polite vs. Rude!

November 14, 2018

Here is a quotation I like on politeness versus rudeness.

“It is a wise thing to be polite; consequently, it is a stupid thing to be rude. To make enemies by unnecessary and willful incivility, is just as insane a proceeding as to set your house on fire. For politeness is like a counter–an avowedly false coin, with which it is foolish to be stingy.”   ― Arthur Schopenhauer

rude

\ rood \, adjective;

  1. discourteous or impolite, especially in a deliberate way.
  2. without culture, learning, or refinement.
  3. rough in manners or behavior; unmannerly; uncouth.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Two!

November 6, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin gramineus, meaning “grassy.” See also graminivorous.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“After we finished building our house, we established a gramineous field around it and fenced it in to accommodate or dogs and horses.”

gramineous

\ gruhmin-ee-uh s \, adjective;

  1. grasslike.
  2. belonging to the Gramineae family of plants.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Happy Halloween, 2018!

October 31, 2018

Happy Halloween!  Halloween, a day dedicated to remembering the dead, has become the day associated with horror movies.  Movies full of demoniacs  or demoniacal  behavior.  And, boy, have there been a few!  Here’s the list.

demoniac, demoniacal

\ dih-moh-nee-ak, dee-muhnahy-ak \, adjective;

  1. of, relating to, or like a demon; demonic.
  2. possessed by or as by an evil spirit; raging; frantic.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

An International Vocabulary!

October 25, 2018

We have had a book titled The Meaning of Tingo: and Other Extraordinary Words from Around the World in our reference collection for a handful of years now (the original copyright was in 2005) and I just recently cracked the cover to get a glimpse of the contents.  What a treasure trove of information on a variety of topics.  So, let’s start with the word “tingo.”  This word originates from the Pascuense (Easter Island; eastern Polynesian language) and it means “to take all the objects one desires from the house of a friend, one at a time, by borrowing them.”  Hmm, I’m not so sure that I can support any form of tingoing.  I would definitely want to get back the first item before lending out the next . . . but that might just be me.

Source: The Meaning of Tingo: and Other Extraordinary Words from Around the World by Adam Jacot de Boinod.

You Don’t Say?!

October 24, 2018

There is nothing worse for an art collector than to be faced with the spurious claim that their recent purchase was not the original work it was reported to be.

spurious

\ spyoor-ee-uh s \, adjective;

  1. not genuine, authentic, or true; not from the claimed, pretended, or proper source; counterfeit.
  2. Biology(of two or more parts, plants, etc.) having a similar appearance but a  different  structure.
  3. of illegitimate birth; bastard.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-One!

October 17, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin noun farrago, meaning “a hodgepodge; mash, medley of grains,” taken into English + English suffix –ous, meaning “full of.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“What we finally had on hand after so many hours of aimless library research and almost aimless writing was a farraginous aggregation of stray information, much of it useless for our project.”

farraginous

\ fuhrajuh-nuh s \, adjective;

1.  heterogeneous; mixed.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Simpler Way of Life!

October 10, 2018

Having grown up in the country on a farm, I can certainly appreciate a more agrestic existence.

agrestic

\ uhgres-tik \, adjective;

  1. rural; rustic.
  2. unpolished; awkward
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Little Deception!

October 3, 2018

No one enjoys being deceived or taken advantage of, by any means.  But when trickery is the culprit, it stings even more to have been duped.  That is, of course, unless you are attending the show of a magician . . . then it seems okay (and we even delight in the deception).

trickery

\ trikuh-ree \, adjective;

  1. the use or practice of tricks or stratagems to deceive; artifice; deception.
  2. a trick used to deceive.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty!

September 26, 2018

Here is a word from the Greek eristikós, meaning “wrangling.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate:

“Adler’s philosophy classes consisted of thirteen weeks of eristic exercises, undeniably a tribute to Eris, the ancient Greek goddess of discord but ostensibly intended to teach the art of disputation.”

eristic

\ e-ris-tik \, adjective;

  1.  pertaining to controversy or disputation; controversial.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.