Archive for the ‘Vocabulary’ Category

Death and Taxes!

April 17, 2018

Happy Tax Day 2018!  According to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word tax (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

tax

\ taks \

noun
1.  a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for
specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales,etc.
2.  a burdensome charge, obligation, duty, or demand.

verb (used with object)
3.  to demand a tax from (a person, business, etc.).
4.to demand a tax in consideration of the possession or occurrence of (income, goods,
sales, etc.), usually in proportion to the value of money involved.
5.  to lay a burden on; make serious demands on.
6.  to take to task; censure; reprove; accuse.
7.  Informal. to charge.
8.  Archaic. to estimate or determine the amount or value of.

verb (used without object)
9.  to levy taxes.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

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Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Two!

April 11, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin operosus, meaning “industrious, active; laborious, elaborate”; from opus, meaning  “a work; workmanship; building.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It did not take them long to devise a plan that was much less operose and could be done quickly.”

operose

opuh-rohs \, adjective;

1.  industrious, as a person.
2.  done with or involving much labor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Brazenness!

April 4, 2018

Are you familiar with “the people of Walmart?”  It is a  website that features user-submitted photos of Walmart customers who are considered to be socially awkward or undesirable.  It often times highlights inappropriate clothing options.  You could say that is provides insight into the impudicity of some Walmart shoppers.

impudicity

\ im-pyoodis-i-tee \, noun;

1.   shamelessness; immodesty.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Let’s Eat!

March 28, 2018

Eating is a fundamental activity in life.  What we eat and how we eat can certainly affect our quality of life.  And, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the ways we eat (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

eat

\ eet \, verb;

1.  to take into the mouth and swallow for nourishment; chew and swallow (food).
2.  to consume by or as if by devouring gradually; wear away; corrode.
3.  to make (a hole, passage, etc.), as by gnawing or corrosion.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Thirty-One!

March 21, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin niveus, meaning “snowy; snow-white.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“My old cottage looked imposingly dressed, the would-be poet said, just waiting to be escoted to a formal dance in the niveous stole of winter.”

niveous

\ niv-ee-uh s \, adjective;

1.  resembling snow, especially in whiteness; snowy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Could I Get Some Help Here?!

March 14, 2018

Sometimes, pleading is required to encourage certain courses of action.  “The designated spokesperson provided quite the hortatory address to the City Council as an appeal to them to declare the neighborhood drug house a nuisance.”

hortatory

\ hawr-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee \, adjective;

1.  urging to some course of conduct or action; exhorting; encouraging.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Drivel!

March 7, 2018

Personally, I live the word “drivel.”  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word drivel (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

drivel

\ drivuh l \

noun
1.  saliva flowing from the mouth, or mucus from the nose; slaver.
2.  childish, silly, or meaningless talk or thinking; nonsense; twaddle.

verb
 (used without object)
3.  to let saliva flow from the mouth or mucus from the nose; slaver.
4.  to talk childishly or idiotically.
5.  Archaic. to issue like spittle.

verb
 (used with object)
6.  to utter childishly or idiotically.
7.  to waste foolishly.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Thirty!

February 27, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin marmoreus, meaning “of marble, like marble”; from Greek mármaros, meaning “marble.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“After we enjoyed the marmoreal pleasures of the Greek galleries, we sampled the armoreal offerings of the medieval rooms.”

marmoreal

\ mahr-mawr-ee-uh l, –mohr– \, adjective;

1.  of or like marble.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Gallows!

February 21, 2018

Back in the day of public executions, the deceased were often times “left on display” for all to see.  An early attempt at deterrence, perhaps.  The means/device for doing so actually has a name (which I recently discovered).  “The executions took place on market days on a hill outside the town, the gibbet somewhat resembling a guillotine.”

gibbet

\ jib-it \, noun;

1.  a gallows with a projecting arm at the top, from which the bodies of criminals were
formerly hung in chains and left suspended after execution. 

verb (used with object)gibbeted, gibbeting.
2.  to hang on a gibbet.
3.  to put to death by hanging on a gibbet.
4.  to hold up to public scorn.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Loving!

February 14, 2018

Happy Valentines Day!  As we ponder the day, the day in which we show our “love” to those close to us, the word “loving” is pretty straightforward.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a couple of other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word loving.  Enjoy!

loving

\ luhv-ing \, adjective;

1.  feeling or showing love; warmly affectionate; fond.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.