Archive for the ‘Vocabulary’ Category

Amazing Adjectives, Number Fourteen!

March 28, 2017
Sometimes you run across words that are highly descriptive!  Here’s one that takes us back to Bacchanalian orgies.   Per The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate, “A Supreme Court justice is reputed to have said of ithyphallic writing, ‘I can’t define it, but I know it when I see it.'”

ithyphallic

\ ith-uhfal-ik \, adjective;
1. of or relating to the phallus carried in ancient festivals of Bacchus.
2. grossly indecent; obscene.
3. (Classical Prosody). noting or pertaining to any of several meters employed in hymns sung in Bacchic processions.

noun;
4. a poem in ithyphallic meter.
5. an indecent poem.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Strongly!

March 21, 2017

I can think of many examples of voices that could be described as orotund.  Military, police, actors (stage especially), radio announcers, politicians, etc. (to name just a few). “He pitched his orotund voice upon me as if he were giving a command in gale at sea.”  From: A Republic Without a President and Other Stories by Herbert Ward.

orotund

\ awruh-tuhnd, ohr– \, adjective;

1. (of the voice or speech) characterized by strength, fullness, richness,and clearness.
2. (of a style of speaking) pompous or bombastic.

Excrement!

March 14, 2017

I’m going to assume that we all know or are familiar with some of the slang words for excrement (shit, crap, turd, dung, etc.).  However, were you aware of these other useful synonyms that you might just find occasion to use?

excrement

\ ek-skruh-muh nt \, noun;

1. waste matter discharged from the body, especially feces.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirteen!

March 7, 2017

Here’s another gem.  I really love my “highly selective” books (dictionary, thesaurus, golden adjectives) “for the extraordinarily literate.”  Here’s a sentence using a word I have never before encountered . . . but may start using myself: “An unusually long rainy season made the region especially uliginous that year.”

uliginous

yoo-lijuh-nuh s \, adjective;

  1.  swampy; slimy; of marshes or water-logged places

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Threatening!

February 28, 2017

“Some held knives, scalpels, syringes, objects he could not recognize tho their minatory nature was all too apparent.” (Usage example courtesy of fatLingo.com)

minatory

minuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee \, adjective;

  1.  menacing; threatening.

    Some additional synonyms might include the following: abusive, blustering, bulldozing, comminatory, fear-inspiring, hectoring, intimidating, menacing, ominous, terrorizing, and threatful.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twelve!

February 7, 2017

How many times have you attended a conference or event expecting to hear a stimulating speaker only to be disappointed by discovering he is nothing more than a magniloquent bore?  Far too often, I’m afraid.  Alas.

magniloquent

\ mag-niluh-kwuh nt \, adjective;

  1.  speaking or expressed in a lofty or grandiose style; pompous; bombastic; boastful.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Some Puns Are Intended!

January 31, 2017

I’ve long used paronomasia as a form of humor which has elicited many a groan over the years.

paronomasia

\ par-uh-noh-mey-zhuh, -zhee-uh, -zee-uh \, noun;

Rhetoric
1.  the use of a word in different senses or the use of words similar in sound to achieve a specific effect, as humor or a dual meaning; punning
2.  a pun

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Why Just Say ‘Evil’. . . ?!

January 24, 2017

. . . when there are so many other words that could be used instead (and for variety).

evil

\ ee-vuh l \, adjective;

According to http://www.dictionary.com, evil is defined as:

1.  morally wrong or bad; immoral; wicked
2.  harmful; injurious 
3.  characterized or accompanied by misfortune or suffering; unfortunate;disastrous

4.  due to actual or imputed bad conduct or character
5.  marked by anger, irritability, irascibility, etc.

noun
6.  that which is evil; evil quality, intention, or conduct
7.  the force in nature that governs and gives rise to wickedness and sin.
8.  the wicked or immoral part of someone or something 
9.  harm; mischief; misfortune  
10.  anything causing injury or harm  
11.  a harmful aspect, effect, or consequence  
12.  a disease, as king’s evil

adverb
13.  in an evil manner; badly; ill  

Idioms
14. the evil one, the devil; Satan
But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Eleven!

January 17, 2017

Why is it that we always want or covet that which we don’t have?  An amazing conundrum for sure.  I have never had ulotrichous hair, but I certainly have been a bit envious of those that do (from time to time).   Then I think about the time it must take to manage and/or care for such hair and revert back to counting my blessings.

ulotrichous

\ yoo-lo-tri-kuh s \, adjective;

1.  belonging to a group of people having woolly or crisply curly hair.

Let’s Collaborate!

January 10, 2017

Before computers, collaboration used to take a much longer time as hard copies of documents traveled from one collaborator to the next with a host of useful variorum commentary.  The speedy gathering of collaborators’ notes has certainly been facilitated through the use of wikis and Google docs.

variorum

\ vair-ee-awruh m, –ohr– \, adjective;

  1. containing different versions of the text by various editors.
  2. containing many notes and commentaries by a number of scholars or critics.

noun;

      1. a variorum edition or text.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com; and The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.