Posts Tagged ‘AARP Bulletin’

These Stats are Smokin’!

December 7, 2017

I know that smoking is somewhat passe these days and the number of smokers has dropped significantly (in the 1960s, approximately 42% of Americans smoked; by 2014 this percentage had dropped to 15.1% of all adults in 2015 (courtesy of the Center for Disease Control).  But when it comes to seniors (age 65+) how do the State rankings fare?  Here are the rankings by state of the percentages of seniors who currently smoke.

Highest percentage:
1. Tennessee (13.8%)
2. Oklahoma (13.0%)
3. Kentucky (12.3%)
3. Nevada (12.3%)
5. Arkansas (11.4%)
5. Louisiana (11.4%)
7. Indiana (10.9%)
8. New Mexico (10.8%)
9. West Virginia (10.7%)
9. Mississippi (10.7%)

Lowest percentage:
1. Utah (5.2%)
2. Hawaii (6.1%)
2. California (6.1%)
4. Texas (6.7%)
4. New Hampshire (6.7%)
6. Connecticut (7.3%)
7. Minnesota (7.4%)
8. Rhode Island (7.5%)
8. New Jersey (7.5%)
10. Maryland (7.6%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, November 2017, p. 44; America’s Health Rankings 2017 Senior Report.

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Are You Visiting Your Dentist?!

November 29, 2017

Most people would probably self-report that they do not enjoying going to the dentist. And, there is probably a good chunk of the population that fails to go for economic reasons.  When you look at the senior population (aged 65+) the percentage varies drastically from state to state.  Here are the states with the highest percentage of seniors visiting dental professionals as well as the states with the lowest percentages.

Highest percentages
1.  Hawaii (78.1%)
2.  Minnesota (75.6%)
3.  Connecticut (75.1%)
4.  New Hampshire (74.1%)
5.  Michigan (72.4%)
6.  Vermont (71.9%)
6.  Massachusetts (71.9%)
8.  Wisconsin (71.6%)
9.  California (71.3%)
10.  Utah (71.0%)

Lowest percentages
1.  West Virginia (48.6%)
2.  Mississippi (54.0%)
3.  Arkansas (54.5%)
4.  OKLAHOMA (55.4%)
5.  Kentucky (57.0%)
6.  Louisiana (57.2%)
7.  Alabama (57.9%)
8.  Tennessee (58.6%)
9.  Missouri (58.8%)
10.  Nevada (9.7%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, October 2017, p. 44 and 2017 Heath Rankings Senior Report.

Long-Term Care!

November 22, 2017

According to a study compiled by the AARP Public Policy Institute, the Commonwealth Fund, and the SCAN Foundation, “more than 9 in 10 Americans want to live at home or with a relative — rather than at a nursing home — for as long as possible.”  According to the study some states would be able to provide this to seniors better than others.  For the states that do it well, it is not only good for the person needing care, but it is generally less expensive to boot.  The states that do this the best include:

  1. Washington
  2. Minnesota
  3. Vermont
  4. Oregon
  5. Alaska

The states that don’t do quite as well include:

46.  Tennessee
47.  Mississippi
48.  Alabama
49.  Kentucky
50.  Indiana

Source: AARP Bulletin, September 2017, p 38.

How Do You Spend Your Free Time?!

November 2, 2017

Do you believe in “giving back?”  Do you volunteer or donate your time to any organizations?  Seniors certainly do (and they usually have the time to do so) but it does vary from state to state.  Here are the state rankings (highest percentages and lowest percentages) for seniors (65+) who donated their time in the past year.  Oklahoma is safely is the middle of the pack at 24%.

Highest percentages
1.  Utah (46%)
2.  Minnesota (38%)
3.  North Dakota (37%)
3.  Kansas (37%)
5.  South Dakota (36%)
6.  Nebraska (35%)
6.  Idaho (35%)
8.  Vermont (34%)
9.  Wisconsin (33%)
9.  Iowa (33%)

Lowest percentages
1.  Louisiana (16%)
2.  New York (17%)
3.  West Virginia (18%)
3.  Nevada (18%)
5.  Virginia (19%)
5.  Georgia (19%)
5.  Florida (19%)
5.  Rhode Island (19%)
9.  Arkansas (20%)
10.  Texas (21%)
10.  Arizona (21%)
10.  New Jersey (21%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, September 2017, p. 44; America’s Health Rankings: 2017 Senior Report.

Some Groaners!

August 28, 2017

Last month I ran across some jokes that were advertised as “You Gotta Laugh,” and boy, were they right!   Enjoy!

Q: What was the patriots’ favorite food in the Revolutionary War?
A: Chicken catch-a-Tory!

“I just got an email about how to read maps backward, but it turned out to be spam.”

Grandpa: Young man, I’d like to tell you a joke about Social Security.”
Grandson: “What’s that?”
Grandpa: “You probably won’t get it.”

Source: AARP Bulletin, July-August 2017, p. 54

Oh Where, Oh Where Should I Retire?!

June 18, 2017

According to the 2016 United Movers Study (unitedvanlines.com/movers-study/move-for-retirement), the most tax-friendly states are as follows:

  1. Delaware (no tax on social security benefit)
  2. Florida (no tax on retirement income)
  3. Nevada (no inheritance or estate tax)
  4. South Carolina (no tax on social security benefit)
  5. Arizona (property tax break for seniors)
  6. New Mexico (tax rebates for those 65+)
  7. Idaho (no tax on social security benefit)
  8. Montana (No state sales tax)
  9. Maine (no tax on social security benefit)
  10. New Hampshire (no income tax)

Source: AARP Bulletin, June 2017

Let’s Not Be Idle!

May 22, 2017

Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial for a variety of reasons . . .

  • Control Your Weight.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.
  • Reduce your risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Some Cancers.
  • Strengthen Your Bones and Muscles.
  • Improve Your Mental Health and Mood.

So, how active are you?  Here are the best and the worst states by the percentage of people who are over 50 years of age who engage in NO physical activity whatsoever . . .

States with the lowest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Colorado (18%)
2. Oregon (20%)
2. Washington (20%)
4. Idaho (21%)
5. Vermont (22%)

States with the highest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Arkansas (39%)
2. Mississippi (36%)
3. Oklahoma (35%)
3. Kentucky (35%)
4. Louisiana (34%)
4. West Virginia (34%)

Source: May 2017 AARP Bulletin; 2014 survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; numbers are rounded; respondents reported activity level over the previous month.

Fatal Falls!

April 10, 2017

I’m sure you’ve heard the quip “have a nice trip, I’ll see you next fall” in reference to someone who trips or stumbles.  Unfortunately, for people who are 65 years old (or older) falls can have fatal consequences.  Here are the statistics on the number of fatal falls per 100,000 persons by state for 2015 (top ten states, most and least).  Oklahoma finished just outside the top-ten (#11) with 93.

Most Fatal Falls
1.  Wisconsin (135)
2.  Minnesota (126)
3.  Vermont (122)
4.  South Dakota (116)
5.  New Mexico (105)
6.  Colorado (103)
7.  Oregon (98)
7.  Iowa (98)
7.  Rhode Island (98)
10.  New Hampshire (96)

Least Fatal Falls
1.   Alabama (26)
2.  New Jersey (30)
3.  Delaware (36)
4.  California (39)
5.  Louisiana (40)
5.  Indiana (40)
7.  New York (42)
8.  Kentucky (43)
9.  South Carolina (45)
9.  Georgia (45)

Source: AARP Bulletin, April 2017, p. 44; 24/7 Wall Street (numbers are rounded).

So, Would You Like to Live Longer?!

March 23, 2017

No one knows exactly how long they will live, but who doesn’t want to maximize their time in this world?  Here is a list of fifty (50) ways that if put into practice, could help you extend your life (obviously any medically-related “advice” should be vetted through your personal physician).

  1. Consider extra vitamin D (but too much could also be bad).
  2. Cut back on pain pills (including over-the-counter types)
  3. Please go to bed (get more than six hours per night)
  4. But don’t always go right to sleep (ah, the benefits of sex)
  5. Get (or stay) hitched
  6. Ripeness matters (fully ripe = more benefits)
  7. Say yes to that extra cup (of coffee)
  8. Frozen is fine (fruits and veggies)
  9. Go green (as in tea)
  10. Don’t sweeten with sugar
  11. Eat whole grains
  12. Spice it up (chili peppers)
  13. Drink whole milk (dairy fat can be good)
  14. Just add water (stay hydrated)
  15. Be food safe (keep and store food correctly)
  16. Eat less (stop when you feel full)
  17. End the day’s eating by 9:00 PM
  18. Eat your veggies
  19. Eat like the Greeks (i.e., Mediterranean diet)
  20. Or live like the Amish (tend to live longer with less hospitalization)
  21. Drink less
  22. Save your pennies (higher income = live longer)
  23. Or move to one of these states (California, New York, Vermont)
  24. Ponder a ponderosa (experience a sense of awe; nature, music, art)
  25. Go nuts (10 grams a day)
  26. Find your purpose (have something to look forward to)
  27. Embrace your faith
  28. Vacation or else (take some time off)
  29. Consider mountain life (live in higher altitude)
  30. Get a friend with four legs (pet ownership)
  31. Keep watching lol cat videos (laughter is important)
  32. Get social (reduce lonliness)
  33. Watch your grandkids
  34. Try to stay out of the hospital
  35. Monitor yourself (don’t wait for annual checkup)
  36. Visit the hardware store (monitor carbon monoxide, radon, and lead levels)
  37. You need to read (30 minutes per day)
  38. Toss that rug (risk for fall)
  39. Practice home fire drills (know what to do in advance, have a plan)
  40. Find a woman doctor
  41. Make peace with family
  42. Take the stairs – every day
  43. Trade in ol’ Bessie (news car all have high-tech safety features)
  44. Beware the high-tech dash (distracted driving)
  45. And drive less
  46. Better yet, walk (exercise best prescription for long life)
  47. Just not in the street
  48. And go a little faster  (exceed one meter per second)
  49. Get fidgety (don’t “sit” too long)
  50. Read the AARP Bulletin (shameless plug)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 23-30.

The Cost of Care!

March 16, 2017

Judging from the below data re: the cost of nursing home/long-term care, it might behoove me to remain in the State of Oklahoma in my retirement years.  Here’s a list of the states where these costs are least expensive as well as most expensive (median daily cost for long-term care in a semi-private room in 2016) . . .

Most Expensive:
1. Alaska ($800)
2. Connecticut ($407)
3. Massachusetts ($370)
4. New York ($361)
5. North Dakota ($359)
6. Hawaii ($355)
7. District of Columbia ($333)
8. New Jersey ($325)
9. New Hampshire ($320)
10. Delaware ($315)

Least Expensive:
1. OKLAHOMA ($145)
2. Texas ($148)
3. Missouri ($156)
4. Louisiana ($160)
5. Arkansas ($161)
6. Kansas ($171)
7. Iowa ($182)
8. Illinois ($184)
9. Nebraska ($185)
9. Utah ($185)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 44 (from Genworth 2016 Cost of Care Survey)