Posts Tagged ‘Artist’

The Plastic Tree!

November 12, 2018

Trees-PlasticHere is the final installment of my summer art acquisitions.  This one was discovered at the Sutton’s Bay Art Festival which generally falls on the first weekend of August.   This piece (which measures 13″ x 16″) is not actually a “painting.”  Rather, it is a mixed-media creation using plastic bags.  The title: untitled [I’m going to call it “Plastic Tree”), the artist: Mary O’Neill, the medium: plastic.  The unique thing about Mary’s plart (plastic art), is that she uses “post-consumer” materials.  Plastic is everywhere these days and this artist is able to create masterpieces using fused plastic (bags and other packaging ironed together).  Personally, I never realized that there were so many different colors to the plastic bags that we acquire through the course of our existence.  Pretty amazing.

Reed Reflection!

October 8, 2018

Reed ReflectionHere is the second (of four) original works of art that I was able to acquire while on vacation this past summer.  I always enjoy the art culture in the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan.  I acquire this one at the Crooked Tree Outdoor Art Fair (which is always held on the last weekend of July on the campus of Northwestern Michigan College).  The title: Untitled [but I’m calling it Reed Reflection], the artist: Marina Kontorina, the medium: watercolor.  I’m not yet sure where I will hang this exquisite piece [it’s huge — 32-1/2″ x 37″] but I will manage to find room for it on one of my already full walls . . . some creative rehanging may have to occur to achieve this.  Alas, the challenges of the insatiable appetite of an art collector.

Abstract Expressionism!

September 25, 2018

Happy Birthday Markus Yakovlevich Rothkowitz, aka Mark Rothko!  Rothko was an American painter of Russian Jewish descent whose paintings fell into the realm of abstract expressionism (along with other notable artists of the time: Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning).  I have to admit, every time I discovered one of Mark Rothko’s paintings in the galleries I visited I would contemplate that it was something that I could have created (obviously not).  I failed to understand his genius but he has certainly attained critical acclaim.  Check out some of his works here.

Cross Stitch!

August 12, 2018

NeedlepointI recently acquired a beautiful cross stitch piece done by a co-worker (thank you Karl).  It represents the opening line of a poem by the same title by Emily Dickinson.  I can’t wait to get this framed and on the wall!  Here is the entire poem:

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –

Source: The Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by R. W. Franklin (Harvard University Press, 1999)

Bradford Pear Blossoms!

July 29, 2018

BarlettPearBack in May, the library was having a silent auction as a fundraiser for the entertainment committee.  I found this wonderful photograph by a co-worker (thank you Donna) and bid enough to take it home with me.  The title: Bradford Pear Blossoms, the photographer: Donna Graham.    It came fully framed and ready to just go up on the wall.  Easy peezey, lemon squeezy.  It is truly a pleasure to work with some really talented and artistic people.

My Favorite “Kiss!”

July 14, 2018

The_Kiss_-_Gustav_Klimt_-_Google_Cultural_Institute

The Kiss by Gustav Klimt [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I have long been a fan of the artist Gustav Klimpt, who was born on this date in 1862.  Happy Birthday Gustav!  Here is my favorite works by this artist.  The Kiss, painted between 1907-1908, is considered Klimpt’s most popular work and currently hangs in the  Österreichische Galerie Belvedere museum in the Belvedere palace, Vienna, Austria.

Another one of my favorite Klimpt paintings is The Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I which was featured in the 2015 movie, Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds, which told the tale of how the painting, stolen by the Nazis in 1941, was eventually returned to the family after a lengthy court battle.

Fire and Ice!

July 12, 2018

Fire and IceA couple of months ago, while attending the Oklahoma Library Association’s Annual Conference, I entered a raffle for a work of art . . . and won!  The title of this piece: “Fire and Ice” (from the House of Voodoo Series), the artist: Rudy Ellis, the medium: enhanced digital photography.  This was a rather large piece (24″ x 36″) that required some creative “shuffling” of paintings hanging in my bedroom.  Alas, the challenges of an art collector who is rapidly running out of wall space.  But, I always manage to find a way to get new acquisitions up on the wall (so far).  Rudy has been a professional artist for over 35 years from Ardmore, Oklahoma. His creative foci are in enhanced digital photography, photography, painting, illustration and design.   I always enjoy discovering new talent.  My apologies for the “flash” in the middle of the picture; I have not yet mastered the photographing of art behind glass — I either get a reflection off of the glass, or the flash.  Alas.

 

The Parking Lot View!

June 12, 2018

VineyardThe view from the parking lot of the winery (Boskydel Vineyards) has long been appreciated by visitors and artists alike.  Here is a rendition of the view by a local artist, Stephanie Schlatter, who painted an entire series titled “On the Michigan Wine Trail” in which she explored the relationship between art and wine.  In the artist’s own words, “from its lakes, both great and small, to its ever-changing landscapes, Michigan is truly a beautiful and inspiring place to call ‘home.’  I am particularly drawn to the lush areas of this state that have rolling hills, vibrant colors and rich soil where the vines live and grow.  As an artist I want to know these places — I need to know them.  I feel fortunate to live in close proximity to these unique locales, and to experience the beautiful medley of all four seasons.  I’ve gotten to know the people who live and farm Michigan’s bountiful wine regions.  I’ve listened to their stories, and explored their artistic processes from the ground to the vine, from the grape to the glass.

‘On the Michigan Wine Trail’ was inspired by these wine country explorations.  It’s more than just a series of paintings attempting to re-create it beautiful scenery.  It explores the essence of Michigan’s wine regions’ many seasonal faces.  It reveals the hearts of the people who live there, and what happens to them as they inhabit and grow attached to this enchanting place.  It captures the magic that I personally found there, which has, in turn, captured me.

My series, like their wine, tells of the people: their journeys, their art and the relationships they’ve built with the land.  The stories are all there on the canvas, like a bottle of wine, waiting for us to uncork it.”

Harvest!

May 12, 2018

HarvestHere is the last of the new pieces that I purchased back in October 2017 at the annual “Art in the Square” event at Utica Square in Tulsa.  This piece, entitled “Harvest,” is another abstract painting (acrylic) by Christopher Westfall.  The colors, the lines, the flow, the beautiful sunny day in October (even though it was a little warm) . . . all reminded me of my favorite time of year — autumn and the harvest season.

The 3rd of May . . .!

May 3, 2018
3rd_of_May_1808

The Third of May 1808

“The Third of May 1808,” was a painting commissioned by the provisional government of Spain to commemorate the Spanish resistance to Napoleon’s armies during the occupation of 1808 in the Peninsular War.  It was painted by Francisco Goya in 1814 along with a companion piece, “The Second of May 1808” (aka “The Charge of the Mamelukes“).  Both paintings are currently in the public domain and are displayed in Madrid’s Museo del Prado.