Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Eight!

August 16, 2018

Here is a word from the English xeno-, a combining form meaning “alien, strange”; from the Greek xenos, a combining form meaning “a stranger, guest, alien, foreigner.”  The word is completed by the English -morphic, from -morphous, a combining form meaning “having the shape or form of.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It was not until the very end of the expedition that they came upon strata yielding the predicted xenomorphic rock specimens.”

xenomorphic

\ zen-uhmawr-fik, zee-nuh-k \, adjective;

1.  Also, allotriomorphic. Petrography. noting or pertaining to a mineral grain that does  not have its characteristic crystalline form but has form impressed on it by   surrounding grains; anhedral.
2.  in an unusual form; having a strange form.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Live Birth Versus Egg!

August 8, 2018

Today’s word describes animals that produce live babies instead of reproducing through eggs.  And while the category of animals that are viviparous includes mostly mammals, some fish and insects have this trait as well.

viviparous

\ vahy-vip-er-uh s, vi- \, adjective;

1. Zoology. bringing forth living young rather than eggs, as most mammals and some  reptiles and fishes.
2. Botany. producing seeds that germinate on the plant.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Little Bulge!

August 2, 2018

Today’s word is another very common word a growth or expansion.  So here are some other ways to swelling that may just “grow on you.”

swelling

\ swel-ing \, noun;

1.  the act of a person or thing that swells.
2.  the condition of being or becoming swollen.
3.  a swollen part; a protuberance or prominence.

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Seven!

July 25, 2018

Here is a word from the Old Norse vaga, meaning “to sway”; from the English wag meaning “mishievous lad; habitual joker.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“My friends mistakenly thought of me as waggish, not realizing that beneath my jocund exterior lay brooding self-doubt.”

waggish

\ vat-ik \, adjective;

1.  like a wag; roguish in merriment and good humor; jocular
2.  characteristic of or befitting a wag

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Who Knew?!

July 19, 2018

Growing up in a household where homemade bread was the norm, I’m quite familiar with the yeasty smell that would permeate the house during the pre-baking process.  However, I was totally unaware of the many other definitions of yeasty.  Now I know.

yeasty

\ uhk-sawr-ee-uh s, –sohr-, uhg-zawr-, -zohr- \, adjective;

1. of, containing, or resembling yeast.
2. frothy; foamy.
3. youthful; exuberant; ebullient.
4. trifling; frivolous.
5. characterized by agitation, excitement, change, etc.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

This Could Be Harmful to Your Health!

July 11, 2018

Today’s word is a very common word attributed to one’s life and/or lifestyle and eating habits.   But this doesn’t mean that you can’t use a different word every now and then.

unhealthy

\ uhn-hel-thee \, adjective;

1. not in a state of good or normal health; in an unsound, weak, or morbid condition.
2. symptomatic of or resulting from bad health
3. not conducive to good health; unhealthful
4. morally bad, harmful, or contaminating
5. dangerous; risky

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Six!

July 3, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin vates, meaning “poet; prophet.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Much to the surprise of Samantha’s ardent admirers, her most important vatic pronouncements, so characteristic of her, went unnoticed until long after her death.”

vatic

\ vat-ik \, adjective;

1.  of, relating to, or characteristic of a prophet.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Doting Husband . . . !

June 27, 2018

I’ve never been married, but I probably would be a most uxorious husband if Ms. right every crosses my path.  I seem to already have a well-ingrained “disease to please” which would play into this type of behavior quite easily.

uxorious

\ uhk-sawr-ee-uh s, –sohr-, uhg-zawr-, -zohr- \, adjective;

 1. doting upon, foolishly fond of, or affectionately submissive toward one’s wife.

 Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

I Condemn Thee!

June 20, 2018

Today’s word is not quite as common a word as some of my previous posts.  So, your need of additional synonyms to “change things up” may not be quite as critical, but here we go nonetheless.

vituperation

\ vahy-too-puhrey-shuh n, -tyoo-, vi- \, adjective;

1.  verbal abuse or castigation; violent denunciation or condemnation.

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Five!

June 13, 2018

Here is a word from the Neo-Latin ventricosis, or the Latin venter, meaning “belly.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“The young physician could only guess at the cause of the patient’s puzzling ventricose symptom, which was giving such discomfort.”

ventricose

\ ven-tri-kohs \, adjective;

1.  swollen, especially on one side or unequally; protuberant.

2.  having a large abdomen.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.