Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-One!

October 17, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin noun farrago, meaning “a hodgepodge; mash, medley of grains,” taken into English + English suffix –ous, meaning “full of.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“What we finally had on hand after so many hours of aimless library research and almost aimless writing was a farraginous aggregation of stray information, much of it useless for our project.”

farraginous

\ fuhrajuh-nuh s \, adjective;

1.  heterogeneous; mixed.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Simpler Way of Life!

October 10, 2018

Having grown up in the country on a farm, I can certainly appreciate a more agrestic existence.

agrestic

\ uhgres-tik \, adjective;

  1. rural; rustic.
  2. unpolished; awkward
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Little Deception!

October 3, 2018

No one enjoys being deceived or taken advantage of, by any means.  But when trickery is the culprit, it stings even more to have been duped.  That is, of course, unless you are attending the show of a magician . . . then it seems okay (and we even delight in the deception).

trickery

\ trikuh-ree \, adjective;

  1. the use or practice of tricks or stratagems to deceive; artifice; deception.
  2. a trick used to deceive.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty!

September 26, 2018

Here is a word from the Greek eristikós, meaning “wrangling.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate:

“Adler’s philosophy classes consisted of thirteen weeks of eristic exercises, undeniably a tribute to Eris, the ancient Greek goddess of discord but ostensibly intended to teach the art of disputation.”

eristic

\ e-ris-tik \, adjective;

  1.  pertaining to controversy or disputation; controversial.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

No, Not the Soles!

September 19, 2018

Whenever I was punished, it was usually on the buttocks . . . I can’t even imagine how painful it would be to be struck on the bottoms of one’s feet.  A cinematic example of this punishment can be found in the movie “Midnight Express,” where the guard savagely beat the prisoner’s feet with a bastinado.

bastinado

\ bas-tuhney-doh, –nah-doh\, noun;

  1. mode of punishment consisting of blows with a stick on the soles of the feet or on the buttocks.
  2. blow or a beating with a stick, cudgel, etc.
  3. stick or cudgel.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Let’s Not Slander!

September 12, 2018

My father was of the opinion that if you couldn’t say anything nice, it was best to not say anything at all.  Unfortunately in the world today this practice is seldom followed.  People are being vilified on a regular basis (especially in the court of public opinion via the media and social media outlets).  And, while “vilify” is an awesome word, there are some other synonyms that you could use every now and then.

vilify

\ viluh-fahy \, adjective;

  1. to speak ill of; defame; slander.
  2. Obsoleteto make vile.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Nine!

September 5, 2018

Here is a word from the Medieval Latin diaphanus, and the Greek diaphaínen, meaning “to show through.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate:

“Whether dancers intent on attracting spirited young men chose to wear diaphanous gowns is entirely their own decision.”

diaphanous

\ dahy-afuh-nuh s \, adjective;

  1. very sheer and light; almost completely transparent or translucent.
  2. delicately hazy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Above and Beyond!

August 29, 2018

The movie “Hacksaw Ridge” provides us with a perfect example of today’s word. Private Desmond T. Doss, the only conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor exemplifies supererogate perfectly.  “The medic was a supererogatory hero for running back onto the battlefield to save soldiers after being ordered to withdraw.”

supererogate

\ soo-per-eruh-geyt \, verb;

1. to do more than duty requires.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Not Your Usual Michievousness!

August 22, 2018

Today’s word is fairly common, but there are so many other words one could use to convey the same concept that it seems quite wasteful to not exercise this ability from time to time.

rascal

\ ras-kuh l \, noun;

1. a base, dishonest, or unscrupulous person.
2. a mischievous person or animal.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Eight!

August 16, 2018

Here is a word from the English xeno-, a combining form meaning “alien, strange”; from the Greek xenos, a combining form meaning “a stranger, guest, alien, foreigner.”  The word is completed by the English -morphic, from -morphous, a combining form meaning “having the shape or form of.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It was not until the very end of the expedition that they came upon strata yielding the predicted xenomorphic rock specimens.”

xenomorphic

\ zen-uhmawr-fik, zee-nuh-k \, adjective;

1.  Also, allotriomorphic. Petrography. noting or pertaining to a mineral grain that does  not have its characteristic crystalline form but has form impressed on it by   surrounding grains; anhedral.
2.  in an unusual form; having a strange form.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.