Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Yarn!

August 8, 2017

For those of us who knit, crochet, or weave, yarn is a common material for these activities.  But you can certainly use some other descriptive and less common words if you’d like some variety (see below).

yarn

\ yahrn \, noun;

1.  thread made of natural or synthetic fibers and used for knitting and weaving.
2.  a continuous strand or thread made from glass, metal, plastic, etc.
3.  the thread, in the form of a loosely twisted aggregate of fibers, as of hemp, of which rope is made (rope yarn)
4.  a tale, especially a long story of adventure or incredible happenings

verb
(used without object)
5.  Informal. to spin a yarn; tell stories.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty!

August 2, 2017

The grape harvest is still several weeks away, but I ran across this word that certainly helps define “when the time is right,” so to speak.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“In late August, the field’s purple grapes were suddenly covered with a glaucous powder, signaling to all believers that the field could be harvested in three or four weeks.”

glaucous

\ glaw-kuh s \, adjective;

1.  light bluish-green or greenish-blue.
2.  Botany. covered with a whitish bloom, as a plum.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

I’ve Changed My Mind!

July 26, 2017

I have never actually encountered this word before and according to the difficulty index, few English speakers likely know this word.  Following weeks of negotiations, imagine our surprise at the abrupt, 11th-hour volte-face.

volte-face

\ volt-fahs, vohlt-; French vawltuhfas \, noun;

  1.  a turnabout, especially a reversal of opinion or policy.
  2.  a complete change of one’s attitude toward something.

Sources: www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Let’s Get a Translation!

July 18, 2017

During my previous career in law enforcement, I was able to speak a little Spanish and communicate on the simple stuff.   But very now and then, an actual interpreter with more advanced language skills was required.  And while everyone knows and understands what an interpreter is, there is quite the variety of other words that you could use instead (see below).

interpreter

\ in-tur-pri-ter \, noun;

1.  a person who interprets.
2.  a person who provides an oral translation between speakers who speak different languages.
3.  Computers.
a.  hardware or software that transforms one statement at a time of program written in a high-level language into a sequence of machine actions and executes the statement immediately before going on to transform the next statement.
Compare compiler (def 2).
b.  an electromechanical device that reads the patterns of holes in punched cards and prints the same data on the cards, so that they can be read more conveniently by people.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Nineteen!

July 11, 2017

Here is a word from the English galacto-, a combining form meaning “milk,” and -poietic, a combining form meaning “making.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“She was given what they said would be a galactopoietic diet, suggesting it would help her nurse the baby successfully.”

galactopoietic

guh-lak-tuh-poi-et-ik \, adjective;

1.  increasing the secretion of milk.

noun
2.  a galactopoietic agent or medicine.

 

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Let’s Not Quibble!

July 3, 2017

When I think back to last April’s NCAA tournament, we can pettifog over the lineups and player rotations all you want, but ultimately, the Spartans lost to the Jayhawks because Michigan State wasn’t hitting their shots down the final stretch.

pettifog

\ pet-ee-fog, -fawg \, verb;

  1. to bicker or quibble over trifles or unimportant matters.
  2. to carry on a petty, shifty, or unethical law business.
  3. to practice chicanery of any sort.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

A Dedication!

June 27, 2017

I think it is fair to say that we’ve all seen an occasional “inscription” inside a book, or possibly on a gravestone.  And while “inscription” seems to be a fairly common word, you can certainly use some other descriptive and less common words to get the point across as well, if you so choose (see below).

inscription

\ in-skrip-shuh n \, noun;

1.  something inscribed.
2.  a historical, religious, or other record cut, impressed, painted, or written on stone, brick, metal, or other hard surface.
3.  a brief, usually informal dedication, as of a book or a work of art.
4.  a note, as a dedication, that is written and signed by hand in a book.
5.  the act of inscribing.
6.  Pharmacology. the part of a prescription indicating the drugs and the amounts to be mixed.

British.1.  an issue of securities or stocks.
2.  a block of shares in a stock, as bought or sold by one person.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Spruce Things Up a Bit!

June 13, 2017

Many an owner will go to great lengths to titivate their home before putting the house on the market in the hopes of further enticing a buyer.

titivate

\ tituh-veyt \, verb;

  1. spruce up
  2. adorn
  3. put the finishing touches to

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Just a Bit Wordy!

June 6, 2017

Some people just have the gift of gab.  They can talk incessantly and usually use way too many words to get their point across.  And while “wordy” is a very descriptive and easily understood word, you can certainly use other words to get the point across (see below).

wordy

\ wur-dee \, adjective;

1. characterized by or given to the use of many, or too many, words; verbose
2. pertaining to or consisting of words; verbal.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Seventeen!

May 30, 2017

Here is another word that I have never actually run across in any book I have read to date, but you just never know when you will encounter a new word or two.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“The eagle has a falcate beak which enables the bird to pull apart its prey while sailing high in the sky.”

falcate

\ fal-keyt or fal-key-tid \, adjective;

 1. curved like a scythe or sickle; hooked; falciform.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.