Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Seven!

February 20, 2019

Here is a word from the French mal à propos, meaning “inopportune,” literally “badly (suited) to the purpose.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Sara had a knack for choosing malapropos moments for asking personal questions.”

malapropos

\ mal-ap-ruhpoh \, adjective;

  1. inappropriate; out of place; inopportune; untimely.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Japanese Art Form!

February 13, 2019

“Nampo made calligrphies ( calligraphy ) mainly in the tanzaku and kakemono format.”  Once I hang art on the wall, I usually keep it there.  The kakemono format (e.g., like a scroll) allows the work to be displayed when needed, but then rolled up to be stored when not in use.

kakemono

\ kah-kuhmoh-noh; Japanese kah-ke-maw-naw \, noun;

  1. vertical hanging scroll containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

New Embellishments?!

February 6, 2019

At the end of the workday, we all travel to a place we call home.  But what makes a place a “home?”  In a word, decoration.  What we choose to surround ourselves with to create a comfy and pleasing environment makes all the difference and should be a space we relish returning to.

decoration

\ dek-uhrey-shuh n \, noun;

  1. something used for decorating; adornment; embellishment.
  2. the act of decorating.
  3. interior decoration.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Six!

January 30, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin lambens, present participle of lambere, meaning “to wash, to lick.” As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“The coals had long been gray, but lambent tongues of flame continued to dance over the embers occasionally.”

lambent

\ lambuh nt \, adjective;

  1. running or moving lightly over surface.
  2. dealing lightly and gracefully with subject; brilliantly playful.
  3. softly bright or radiant

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Devoted Follower!

January 23, 2019

“Hafiz was surrendered, a voluntary martyr; other ministers were deposed; Mustafa Pasha, aga of the janissaries, was saved by his own troops.”  Hmm, sounds like an early version of our Navy SEALs/Army Rangers/Green Berets.

janissary

\ januh-ser-ee \, noun;

  1. a member of an elite military unit of the Turkish army organized in the 14th century and abolished in 1826 after it revolted against the Sultan.
  2. any soldier in the Turkish army.
  3. a member of any group of loyal guards, soldiers, or supporters.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Watch Your Phraseology!

January 16, 2019

According to the Oxford English Dictionary online, the word profane “carried the meaning of either “desecrating what is holy” or “with a secular purpose.” Usage of the term was discovered as early as the 1450s.

profanity

\ pruhfan-i-tee, proh- \, noun;

  1. the quality of being profane; irreverence.
  2. profane conduct or language; a profane act or utterance.
  3. obscenity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Five!

January 9, 2019

Here is a word from the English jackboot, meaning “a popular style of leather boot,” + a suffix signifying a past participle, -ed. As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“When the jackbooted crowd roared into town, women gripped their purses tighter and ordinary men did their best to find shelter without allowing themselves to appear fightened.”

jackbooted

\ jak-boo-tid \, adjective;

  1. wearing jackboots, especially those who ride motorcycles.
  2. brutally and oppressively bullying.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

How Calloused!

January 2, 2019

In our modern, capitalistic (and materialistic) society, we must be continually strive to keep greediness from indurating our hearts to those who are less fortunate.

indurate

\ in-doo-reyt, -dyoo– \, adjective;

  1. to make hard; harden, as rock, tissue, etc.
  2. to make callous, stubborn, or unfeeling.
  3. to inure; accustom.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Uncommonly Common!

December 26, 2018

Some words that you encounter just make you smile.  Then when you discover some of their synonyms, you smile even wider!  Prosaic is one of those words for me.

prosaic

\ proh-zey-ik \, adjective;

  1. commonplace or dull; matter-of-fact or unimaginative.
  2. of or having the character or form of prose, the ordinary form of spoken or written language, rather than of poetry.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Four!

December 19, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin ignescens, present participle of ignescere, meaning “to burst into flames; burn.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“He was blessed with the type of ignescent personality that quickly burst into a five-alarm fire at the slightest provocation.”

ignescent

\ ig-nesuh nt \, adjective;

  1. emitting sparks of fire, as certain stones when struck with steel.
  2. bursting into flame.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.