Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

How About Some Redundancy?!

December 12, 2017

Personally speaking, I tend to dislike redundancy, but it seems to abound in the world today.  And, as words go, fairly common.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a few other synonyms (see below) that could be used when discussing the topic.  Enjoy!

redundant

\ ri-duhn-duh n-see \, noun

1.  the state of being redundant.
2.  superfluous repetition or overlapping, especially of words.
3.  a redundant thing, part, or amount; superfluity.
4.  the provision of additional or duplicate systems, equipment, etc.,
that function in case an operating part or system fails, as in a spacecraft.
5.  Linguistics. the inclusion of more information than is necessary for communication, as in those cars, where both words are marked for plurality; the additional, predictable information so included; the degree of predictability thereby created.
6.  Chiefly British.  the condition or fact of being unemployed; unemployment; a layoff.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Or, using the adjective redundancy, here are some other optional words:

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

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Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Six!

December 5, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin lanuginosus, meaning “downy,” from lanugo, meaning “wooliness, + -osus, an adjectival suffix meaning “abounding in.”   Also given as lanuginous.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Where we had expected to find a scaly outer skin, we were surprised to find the creature had a lanuginose covering from neck to tail.”

lanuginose

\ luhnoo-juh-nohs, –nyoo– \, adjective;

1.  covered with lanugo, or soft, downy hairs.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Allow Me to Offer the Eulogy!

November 28, 2017

It has recently become the tradition at many of the Catholic funeral masses I have attended to have an encomiast (or the invitation for any attendee(s) to provide an encomium).

encomiast

\ en-koh-mee-ast, –uh st \, noun;

1.  a person who utters or writes an encomium; eulogist.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Five!

November 14, 2017

Here is a word possibly from the Middle English knorre, meaning “a knot,” + -ed, an adjectival suffix.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Without the knurled edge, neither my wife nor I would ever have been able to open a jar of martini olives.”

knurled

\ nurld \, adjective;

1. having small ridges on the edge or surface; milled.
2. having knurls or knots; gnarled.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

How Soothing!

November 7, 2017

Getting sick is never fun (especially in the summer) and having a raw or irritated throat can make your life miserable.  So, when I feel the first tickle in my throat, I’m quickly reaching for any demulcent throat lozenge that I can find.

demulcent

\ dih-muhl-suh nt \, adjective;

1.  soothing or mollifying, as a medicinal substance

noun
2.  a demulcent substance or agent, often mucilaginous, as for soothing or protecting an irritated mucous membrane.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Four!

October 24, 2017

Halloween is only a week away, so here is a word from Middle English hagge, meaning “witch,” + ridden, a combining form meaning “overwhelmed by,” part participle of “to ride.”   As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“My hagridden nights, populated with shrieking witches, are leaving me tormented and unrefreshed, scarcely able to face the demands of a new day.”

hagridden

\ hag-rid-n \, adjective;

1.  worried or tormented, as by a witch.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Three!

October 3, 2017

Here is a colloquial word for which the exact origin is unknown.  It could quite probably be a euphemism for buggered.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“After the disappointing news, the poor man spat out ‘I’ll be jiggered,’ and fell silent, apparently feeling better because he ha taken a load off his mind.”

jiggered

\ jig-erd \, adjective;

1.  confounded; damned

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Sorry for the Delay!

September 26, 2017

Today’s word speaks volumes to the lack of timeliness on the part of so many people these days.  Having been raised to always arrive at appointments a little bit early, I guess one of my pet peeves would be having to wait on those who were not similarly raised.

As an avid movie-goer myself, I can sometimes become a bit peeved at the cunctation of other movie-goers because it can disrupt the film.

cunctation

\ kuhngk-tey-shuh n \, noun;

1.   delay; tardiness.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Brilliance!

September 19, 2017

“In addition to its brilliance, vermilion is a pigment of great intensity and durability.” (www.dictionary.com)

brilliance

\ bril-yuh ns \, noun;

1.  great brightness; luster
2.  excellence or distinction; conspicuous talent, mental ability, etc.
3.  splendor, elegance, or magnificence

4.  Optics. that luminance of a body consisting of its saturation and brightness.
But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Two!

September 12, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin idoneous, meaning “fit, proper, suitable.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“On the basis of their idoneous qualifications, all three finalists were given four-month appointments as summer interns to determine how they would respond to the demands of the working environment.”

idoneous

\ ahy-doh-nee-uh s \, adjective;

  1.  appropriate; fit; suitable; apt.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.