Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Four!

May 23, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin otiosis, meaning “at leisure, unemployed; out of public affairs.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Many of the men and women seen smoking behind the student center are not students at all, but otiose dropouts with nothing better to do.”

“You are wrong to think an action of the kind I have been discussing is otiose, rather than helpful to our cause.”

otiose

\ oh-shee-ohs, oh-tee- \, adjective;

1.  being at leisure; idle; indolent.
2.  ineffective or futile.
3.  superfluous or useless.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

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A Little Zest!

May 9, 2018

Today’s word while frequently tied to cooking, recipes, and flavoring, comes with additional definitions related to the vim and vigor that can accompany your life.  And let’s not forget the the brand of soap either.

zest

\ zest \, noun;

1. keen relish; hearty enjoyment; gusto.
2. an agreeable or piquant flavor imparted to something.
3. anything added to impart flavor, enhance one’s appreciation, etc.
4. piquancy; interest; charm.
5. liveliness or energy; animating spirit.
6. the peel, especially the thin outer peel, of a citrus fruit used for flavoring:

lemon zest.

verb (used with object)
7. to give zest, relish, or piquancy to.

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Three!

May 2, 2018

Here is a word from the Roman name Lucullus, the name associated with “the wealthy ancient general and administrator who liked his food and spared no expense when entertaining.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Once Edgar became head of his company he achieved fame for the Lucullan feasts he provided for his numerous guests at his monthly first-Thursday-night galas.”

Lucullan

\ loo-kuhluh n \, adjective;

1. (especially of banquets, parties, etc.) marked by lavishness and richness; sumptuous.
2. of or relating to Lucullus or his life style.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Sticks and Stones . . . !

April 25, 2018

For police officers, the rules are a bit different.  As a public servant, they often times must endure every form of abuse from the public they serve (from verbal to physical) all while remaining calm, polite, and in control of the situation.  The police officer’s “peace” cannot be disturbed, they cannot be “offended” by anything said to, or about them, and they must remain professional at all times . . . even as the public they serve scream imprecations at the officers who are just attempting to do their jobs.

imprecation

\ im-pri-key-shuh n \, noun;

1.  the act of imprecating; cursing.
2.  a curse; malediction.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Death and Taxes!

April 17, 2018

Happy Tax Day 2018!  According to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word tax (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

tax

\ taks \

noun
1.  a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for
specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales,etc.
2.  a burdensome charge, obligation, duty, or demand.

verb (used with object)
3.  to demand a tax from (a person, business, etc.).
4.to demand a tax in consideration of the possession or occurrence of (income, goods,
sales, etc.), usually in proportion to the value of money involved.
5.  to lay a burden on; make serious demands on.
6.  to take to task; censure; reprove; accuse.
7.  Informal. to charge.
8.  Archaic. to estimate or determine the amount or value of.

verb (used without object)
9.  to levy taxes.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Two!

April 11, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin operosus, meaning “industrious, active; laborious, elaborate”; from opus, meaning  “a work; workmanship; building.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It did not take them long to devise a plan that was much less operose and could be done quickly.”

operose

opuh-rohs \, adjective;

1.  industrious, as a person.
2.  done with or involving much labor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Brazenness!

April 4, 2018

Are you familiar with “the people of Walmart?”  It is a  website that features user-submitted photos of Walmart customers who are considered to be socially awkward or undesirable.  It often times highlights inappropriate clothing options.  You could say that is provides insight into the impudicity of some Walmart shoppers.

impudicity

\ im-pyoodis-i-tee \, noun;

1.   shamelessness; immodesty.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Let’s Eat!

March 28, 2018

Eating is a fundamental activity in life.  What we eat and how we eat can certainly affect our quality of life.  And, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the ways we eat (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

eat

\ eet \, verb;

1.  to take into the mouth and swallow for nourishment; chew and swallow (food).
2.  to consume by or as if by devouring gradually; wear away; corrode.
3.  to make (a hole, passage, etc.), as by gnawing or corrosion.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Thirty-One!

March 21, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin niveus, meaning “snowy; snow-white.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“My old cottage looked imposingly dressed, the would-be poet said, just waiting to be escoted to a formal dance in the niveous stole of winter.”

niveous

\ niv-ee-uh s \, adjective;

1.  resembling snow, especially in whiteness; snowy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Could I Get Some Help Here?!

March 14, 2018

Sometimes, pleading is required to encourage certain courses of action.  “The designated spokesperson provided quite the hortatory address to the City Council as an appeal to them to declare the neighborhood drug house a nuisance.”

hortatory

\ hawr-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee \, adjective;

1.  urging to some course of conduct or action; exhorting; encouraging.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.