Posts Tagged ‘Eugene Ehrlich’

Quite the Conundrum!

May 22, 2019

I love a good riddle.  Not only do you get to exercise your brain, you are often times entertained as well at the sometimes obviousness of the answer that you failed to discover with a hint or help.

riddle

\ rid-l \, noun;

  1. question or statement so framed as to exercise one’s ingenuity in answering it or discovering its meaning; conundrum.
  2. puzzling question, problem, or matter.
  3. puzzling thing or person.
  4. any enigmatic or dark saying or speech.

 

verb;

  1. to propound riddles; speak enigmatically.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Fifty-One!

May 15, 2019

Here is a word from the Greek zymotikós, meaning “cause fermentation.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“The pubs in her neighborhood were closed down by an inspector who mistakenly believed the beer served there was afflicted with a zymotic disease.”

zymotic

\ zahy-mot-ik \, adjective;

  1. pertaining to or caused by or as if by fermentation.
  2. of or relating to zymosis.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

That Greasy Look!

May 8, 2019

“Peter was pinguid plump, and plethoric—she was thin to attenuation.” (from The Bunsby Papers by John Brougham).

pinguid

\ ping-gwid \, adjective;

  1. fatty, oily, or greasy; soapy.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Rubbed the Wrong Way?!

May 2, 2019

It never ceases to amaze me the number of different meanings (idiomatic or otherwise) a word can have.  An “erosion” of the English language perhaps?

grind

\ grahynd \, verb;

  1. to wear, smooth, or sharpen by abrasion or friction; whet.
  2. to reduce to fine particles, as by pounding or crushing; bray, triturate, or pulverize.
  3. to oppress, torment, or crush.
  4. to rub harshly or gratingly; grate together; grit.
  5. to operate by turning crank.
  6. to produce by crushing or abrasion.
  7. Slang to annoy; irritate; irk.
  8. to perform the operation of reducing to fine particles.
  9. to rub harshly; grate.

noun;

  1. the act of grinding.
  2. grinding sound.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Fifty!

April 24, 2019

Here is a word from the Greek pachy, meaning “thick,” + dermatos, meaning “skinned.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“A person as pachydermatous as he cannot be expected to understand that his attentions are not welcome.”

“The huge lumbering pachydermatous creature showed remarkable ability to locate and follow its small prey.”

pachydermatous

\ pak-i-dur-muh-tuh s \, adjective;

  1. of, relating to, or characteristic of pachyderms.
  2. thick-skinned; insensitive:

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Newfangled!

April 17, 2019

Back in the day, we had sugar.  Then came the era of artificial sweeteners in an attempt to lessen sugar consumption.  And now there are even more neoteric alternatives to sugar like Stevia., Xylitol, Erythritol, or Yacon Syrup.

neoteric

\ nee-uhter-ik \, adjective;

  1. modern; new; recent.
  2. newfangled.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

I Knew We Were Related!

April 10, 2019

My family is not overly large, but I have “kin” all over the place although they seem to be centered in and around the Great Lakes (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Illinois, and Connecticut).

kinship

\ kin-ship \, noun;

  1. the state or fact of being of kin; family relationship.
  2. relationship by nature, qualities, etc.; affinity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Nine!

April 3, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin obiurgatorius, meaning “reproachful,” from infinitive obiugare, meaning “to scold, rebuke.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Her objurgatory tone, which she adopted as soon as she knew she had been caught, could reduce me to tears.”

objurgatory

\ ob-jer-geyt-or-ee, uh b-jur-geyt-or-ee \, adjective;

  1. uttering or constituting a scolding or sharp rebuke.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Voldemort Defined By a Word!

March 27, 2019

I am a huge fan of the Harry Potter series (books and movies).  Here is a promotional sentence for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1: “As the film begins, the Ministry of Magic is crumbling in the malefic grip of Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), and Harry has a price on his head.”

malefic

\ muhlef-ik \, adjective;

  1. productive of evil; malign; doing harm; baneful.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Without Life?!

March 20, 2019

While the word “dead” really requires no definition, why not try some of these synonyms occasionally and really impress your friends?

lifeless

\ lahyf-lis \, adjective;

  1. not endowed with life; having no life; inanimate.
  2. destitute of living things.
  3. deprived of life; dead

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com