Posts Tagged ‘History’

Ancient History, Number Seventeen!

January 4, 2020

By “ancient history,” I will be referencing events from January 4th that occurred pre-1492 (i.e., before “Columbus sailed the ocean blue”).  Note: most of these will be from the medieval world (476 AD – 1492 AD) as many earlier events don’t always have specific dates.

  • Andrea Dandolo is elected Doge of Venice, Italy (1343 AD).
  • Charles of Orleans, French courtly poet, dies in Ambroise, France, at the age of 70 (1465 AD).

Source: Volume 1 of the Chronology of World History: Prehistory — AD 1491: The Ancient and Medieval World.

New Year’s Eve, 2019!

December 31, 2019

The dropping of the ball in Times Square (New York City) on New Year’s Eve has been going on for quite some time.  Do you know the year that this tradition first started?  Would you believe 1907?

Some other famous “firsts” that occurred on December 31st throughout history include:

  • the first price regulation law enacted by a colony (Rhode Island, 1776)
  • the first book with color plates (The City of Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania North America as it Appeared  in the Year 1800 , Consisting of Twenty-Eight Plates Drawn and Engraved by W. Birch and Son,  1800)
  • the first parade held by a mystic society (Cowbellian Rakian Society, Mobile, AL, 1830)
  • the first dental surgeons to be licensed by a state (Alabama, 1841)
  • the first transatlantic radio broadcast of a voice (1923)
  • the first Socialist Workers Party organizational meeting (Chicago, IL, 1937)
  • the first senator to win a seat that had been occupied by his father and his mother (Russell Long, Louisiana, 1948)
  • the first battery to convert radioactive energy into electrical energy (1951)
  • the first year in which the public debt of the U.S. exceeded $1 trillion (1981)
  • the first ice hotel (Aurora Ice Hotel, Chena Hot Springs, AK, 2003)

Source: Famous First Facts, by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

Ancient History, Number Sixteen!

December 5, 2019

By “ancient history,” I will be referencing events from December 5th that occurred pre-1492 (i.e., before “Columbus sailed the ocean blue”).  Note: most of these will be from the medieval world (476 AD – 1492 AD) as many earlier events don’t always have specific dates.

  • King Theobold II of Navarre dies.  He is succeeded by his brother, Henry I, Count of Champagne (1270 AD).

Source: Volume 1 of the Chronology of World History: Prehistory — AD 1491: The Ancient and Medieval World.

“From the Halls of Montezuma . . . !”

November 28, 2019

This is the first line of the Marine’s Hymn.  Happy Thanksgiving!  Do you know who was the very first Marine officer?  It was Samuel Nicholas who was commissioned as a captain on November 28, 1775.  For more info, check out the full Marine Corp History.

Some other famous “firsts” that occurred on November 28th throughout history include:

  • the first car race (Chicago to Waukegan, IL, 1895) — on Thanksgiving Day!
  • the first skywriting  advertisement exhibition (noon over Times Square, New York City,  1922)
  • the first Senate majority leader (Charles Curtis [KS], 1924)
  • the first airplane flight over the South Pole (1929)
  • the first college football player to score 50 points in one game (Clark Hinkle, Bucknell University, 1929)
  • the first western series on television (Hopalong Cassidy, 1948)
  • the first movie to be shown simultaneously on pay television  and in movie theaters (Forever Female, 1953)
  • the first African-American football player to win the Heisman Memorial Trophy (Ernie Davis, 1961)
  • the first goalie on a National Hockey League team to score a goal (Bill Smith, New York Islanders, 1979)

Source: Famous First Facts, by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

 

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade!

November 27, 2019

Happy day before Thanksgiving!  Thanksgiving may not arrive officially until tomorrow, but today marks the day of the very first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade back in 1924.

In addition, November 27th represents the day for several other “firsts,” such as the first . . .

  • fire of serious consequence  (Boston, MA, 1676)
  • University legally designated as such (University of the State of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 1779)
  • statistical society (American Statistical Association, Boston, MA 1839)
  • Army war college (War Department, Washington, DC, 1901)
  • President to receive a passport while in office (Woodrow Wilson, 1918)
  • radio church (Radio Church of America [Walter J. Garvey], New York, NY, 1921)
  • submarine from the United States destroyed in World War II (Sealion, Cavite, Phillipine Islands, 1939)
  • rocket to intercept an airplane (Nike, White Sands Proving Grounds, NM, 1951)
  • professional hockey player to reach a score of more than 1,000 points (Gordie Howe, Detroit, MI, 1960)

Source: Famous First Facts, by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell

Ancient History, Number Fifteen!

November 4, 2019

By “ancient history,” I will be referencing events from November 4th that occurred pre-1492 (i.e., before “Columbus sailed the ocean blue”).  Note: most of these will be from the medieval world (476 AD – 1492 AD) as many earlier events don’t always have specific dates.

  • King Almaric I of Jerusalem invades Egypt and takes the town of Bilbeis, near Cairo, from the Fatimids (Shiite Muslims) (1168 AD).
  • King John of England’s continued refusal to accept Stephen Langton, the Pope’s choice, as archbishop of Canterbury leads to his excommunication by Pope Innocent III (1209 AD).
  • The Venetian fleet defeats the Genoese at Porto Longo, in the island of Sapienza (1354 AD).
  • King Richard II of England marries Isabella, the daughter of King Charles VI of France (1396 AD).

Source: Volume 1 of the Chronology of World History: Prehistory — AD 1491: The Ancient and Medieval World.

Fly the Friendly Skies!

October 28, 2019

Do you know when sky marshals were first appointed?  (Note: it was long before 9/11.)  They were actually appointed on this date in 1970 by the presidential directive of  of Richard Milhous Nixon.  The original intent was to deal with the proliferation of the hijacking of commercial airplanes.

Some other famous “firsts” that occurred on October 28th throughout history include:

  • the first college founded as a Quaker institution (Haverford School [PA], 1833)
  • the first ticker-tape parade (lower Manhattan [Statue of Liberty dedicatio, 1886)
  • the first statue presented to the U.S.  by a foreign country (Statue of Liberty, 1886)
  • the first catalog cards from the Library of Congress (1901)
  • the first police department to adopt the fingerprinting system (St. Louis, MO, 1904)
  • the first international airplane passenger station (Key West, FL, 1927)
  • the first female Ambassador from the U.S. (Eugenie Moore Anderson [to Denmark], 1949)
  • the first female stock exchange director (1958)
  • the first female United Nations ambassador (Marietta Peabody Tree, 1964)
  • the first television production course at a college (NYU, 1940)
  • the first bank to operate a window in a subway station (Bowery Savings Bank, NYC, 1955)
  • the first Presidential election debates to be shown on television (Nixon/Kennedy, 1960)
  • the first state office of homeland security (Missouri, 2001)

Source: Famous First Facts, by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

Bonnie Blue Flag!

October 12, 2019

Here’s the next installment of  the Nashville Public Television program entitled “Civil War Songs and Stories.”   This month song, “Bonnie Blue Flag” performed by Bo Bice.  Enjoy!

Source: https://youtu.be/dLs7KhcwxM8

Ancient History, Number Fourteen!

October 3, 2019

By “ancient history,” I will be referencing events from October 3rd that occurred pre-1492 (i.e., before “Columbus sailed the ocean blue”).  Note: most of these will be from the medieval world (476 AD – 1492 AD) as many earlier events don’t always have specific dates.

  • Saladin, Sultan of Egypt and Syria, takes Jerusalem after a short siege (1187 AD).
  • John of Brienne marries Maria of Jerusalem and is crowned as king of Jerusalem at Acre (present-day Akko, Israel) (1210 AD).
  • St. Francis of Assisi, founder of the Franciscan monastic orders and church reformer, principal patron saint of Italy, dies in Assisi, Italy (1226 AD).
  • William, Count of Holland, is elected “king of the Romans” (king of Germany) by the Welfs (the anti-Hohenstaufen faction) in Germany (1247 AD).
  • King Alexander III of Scotland defeats King Haakon IV of Norway, in the battle of Largs, after King Haakon IV attempts to subjugate the Hebrides off the west coast of Scotland, having already received the submission of Iceland and the colonists in Greenland, Alexander then subdues the Hebrides himself (1263 AD).
  • David ap Gruffydd, prince of Wales, is executed as a traitor against King Edward I of England for the newly defined crime of “raising war against the king” and by the new penalty of hanging, drawing, and quartering (1283 AD).
  • Under the Treaty of Berwick, King Edward III of England releases King David II of Scotland for a ransom and makes a truce for ten years.  However, his time in England has set David at odds with the Scottish magnates (1357 AD).

Source: Volume 1 of the Chronology of World History: Prehistory — AD 1491: The Ancient and Medieval World.

That’s a Lot of Performances!

September 26, 2019

Do you know which play was the first to reach the one-thousand performances mark? The Gladiator, a five-act  tragedy.  Written by Dr. Robert Montgomery Bird and first performed on September 26, 1831, at the Park Theater (New York City).  By 1853, it had been performed 1,000 times.

Some other famous “firsts” that occurred today throughout history include:

  • the first medical licensing law enacted by a colony (New Jersey, 1772)
  • the first Attorney of the U.S. (Samuel Sherburne, Jr., New Hampshire, 1789)
  • the first Attorney General of the U.S. (Edmund Jennings Randolph, 1789)
  • the first Postmaster General of the U.S. (Samuel Osgood, 1789)
  • the first Federal marshals (1789)
  • the first anti-Masonic Party convention (Baltimore, MD, 1831)
  • the first American cement (1871)
  • the first international rifle tournament of consequence (Creedmoor, NY, U.S. v. Ireland, 1874)
  • the first boycott prevention law enacted by a state (Alabama, 1903)
  • the first television production course at a college (NYU, 1940)
  • the first bank to operate a window in a subway station (Bowery Savings Bank, NYC, 1955)
  • the first Presidential election debates to be shown on television (Nixon/Kennedy, 1960)
  • the first state office of homeland security (Missouri, 2001)

Source: Famous First Facts, by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.