Posts Tagged ‘Phoenix Art Museum’

Necktie of the Month – September 2017!

September 2, 2017

KlimptTieThis month’s tie is an acquisition from my recent trip (the Annual Conference of the Special Libraries Association) to Phoenix, Arizona back in June.  Yes, I was there during a recent “heat wave,” but surprisingly enough, it was not record setting.  Regardless, I opted to stay an extra day, “post-conference,” to take in a few sights and to visit my nephew (Matt) and his finacee (Korrin).  To escape the heat of the day, I  ventured forth to the Phoenix Art Museum (they had a wonderful exhibit of Samurai Armor).  Well, no visit to an aart museum is ever complete with out meandering through the gift shop . . . an voila! . . . I was able to find and acquire a couple of new neckties.  This one is based on the design and style of Gustav Klimpt.  Shown here on my golden yellow shirt, this tie will pair equally well with my light or bright orange shirts as well as my bright yellow or even my beige and brown-toned shirts.  Ah, the versatility!

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What a Tree-t!

July 16, 2017

PAM-TreeHere is another exceptional work of art that I discovered last month while at the Phoenix Art Museum.  This sculpture, by Rebecca Campbell, is entitled “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me?” and “is composed of a tree wrapped in black velvet, standing in a base of salt and with tiny, windex-filled glass birds sitting on its branches” (from the media release).  Campbell explained that her inspiration for the sculpture came from seeing a group of burned trees against a stark snowy background.

Here’s a link to an interview with the artist.

Fancy Knots!

July 5, 2017

SamuraiKnotA coupe of weeks ago, while in Phoenix, Arizona, attending the Annual Conference of the Special Libraries Association (SLA), I was able to stay one extra day (post-conference) to explore a bit and visit family (my nephew and his fiancée) and dropped in on the Phoenix Art Museum.  There were several wonderful exhibits, including a collection of Samurai armor.  The armor seems to have been held in place using cords with a very intricate (and decorative) knotting convention (or at least for show or display purposes).   Very cool indeed (and a most beautiful color as well).