Posts Tagged ‘Statistics’

Just the Stats, Man!

June 19, 2018

Last month I received an informative newsletter from the Michigan State University Libraries that provided their “year-end” statistics in a number of categories (for fiscal year 2016-2017).  Obviously they are a tier-1 research institution and should be expected to have large numbers in these categories, but wow . . . impressive indeed!

Visitors
 —  6.5 million visitors to the website.
—  1.65 million physical visitors to the main library.

Engagement
—  646 presentations and events.
—  14,311 reference questions answered.

Access
— 3,972,264 full-text articles retrieved using library databases.
—  1,498,893 searched of library databases.

Collections
—  7,805,066 unique titles.
—  7,267,012 total volumes.
—  2,768,9554 e-book titles.
—  1,258 electronic databases.

Interlibrary Loan Services
—  18th largest lender in the world.
—  63,939 items from MSU Libraries’ collections were sent to other libraries around the world.
—  16,164 items were borrowed from other libraries for MSU patrons.
—  5,628 items of our own delivered through  document delivery services.

Source: Insight Newsletter, Summer 2018 p. 6.  Data was compiled by Joshua Sanchez, User Experience & Assessment Librarian, from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017.

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Binge Drinking!

February 3, 2018

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), binge drinking is defined as “a pattern of drinking that brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 grams percent or above. This typically happens when men consume 5 or more drinks or women consume 4 or more drinks in about 2 hours.”  When it comes to the “who” re: binge drinking, the CDC further identified the following groups (for the full report, check out this CDC Fact Sheet):

  • One in six US adults binge drinks about four times a month, consuming about eight drinks per binge.
  • Binge drinking is most common among younger adults aged 18–34 years, but is reported across the lifespan.
  • The prevalence of binge drinking among men is twice the prevalence among women.
  • Binge drinking is more common among people with household incomes of $75,000 or more than among people with lower incomes. However, people with lower incomes binge drink more often and consume more drinks when they do.
  • Over 90% of U.S. adults who drink excessively report binge drinking in the past 30 days.
  • Most people younger than age 21 who drink report binge drinking, usually on multiple occasions.

Here is the breakdown by percentage per state (highest and lowest) for adults 65+ who report chronic (more than 1-2 drinks per day) or binge (more than 4-5 drinks at a time) drinking.

Highest percentage:
1. Alaska (10.7%)
2. Wisconsin (10.4%)
3. Nevada (9.8%)
3. Washington, DC (9.8%)
5. Hawaii (9.5%)
6. Oregon (9.4%)
7. Washington (8.5%)
8. Montana (8.3%)
8. Michigan (8.3%)
10. Illinois (8.0%)

Lowest percentage:
1. West Virginia (3.3%)
2. Tennessee (3.8%)
3. Mississippi (3.9%)
4. Arkansas (4.2%)
4. Oklahoma (4.2%)
4. Utah (4.2%)
7. Kentucky (4.3%)
8. South Dakota (4.5%)
8. Alabama (4.5%)
10. Kansas (4.8%)

Source: America’s Health Rankings: Senior Report 2017, AARP Bulletin, Jan-Feb 2018, p. 48.

Some Like It Hot, Others Like It Cold!

December 21, 2017

Happy Thursday!  On this the day of the winter solstice (the official first day of winter), let’s take a moment to ponder (by way of an incredible infographic) the extremes of temperature that we experience not only here on Earth, but throughout the universe. Again, let’s put things into perspective!   Enjoy!

temperature-from-hottest-to-coldest-infographic

Holiday Reminder!

December 14, 2017

Drunk driving continues to have a major impact on the holiday season.  Here is an infographic (updated for 2016, courtesy of SCRAM Systems) that puts this offense in perspective . . . very “sobering” statistics indeed.

 

Print

These Stats are Smokin’!

December 7, 2017

I know that smoking is somewhat passe these days and the number of smokers has dropped significantly (in the 1960s, approximately 42% of Americans smoked; by 2014 this percentage had dropped to 15.1% of all adults in 2015 (courtesy of the Center for Disease Control).  But when it comes to seniors (age 65+) how do the State rankings fare?  Here are the rankings by state of the percentages of seniors who currently smoke.

Highest percentage:
1. Tennessee (13.8%)
2. Oklahoma (13.0%)
3. Kentucky (12.3%)
3. Nevada (12.3%)
5. Arkansas (11.4%)
5. Louisiana (11.4%)
7. Indiana (10.9%)
8. New Mexico (10.8%)
9. West Virginia (10.7%)
9. Mississippi (10.7%)

Lowest percentage:
1. Utah (5.2%)
2. Hawaii (6.1%)
2. California (6.1%)
4. Texas (6.7%)
4. New Hampshire (6.7%)
6. Connecticut (7.3%)
7. Minnesota (7.4%)
8. Rhode Island (7.5%)
8. New Jersey (7.5%)
10. Maryland (7.6%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, November 2017, p. 44; America’s Health Rankings 2017 Senior Report.

How About a Little Scale/Perspective?!

September 13, 2017

To truly understand where and how we fit into this world, here’s an infographic that will hopefully shed some light on the scale of the earth (from the tallest mountain to the deepest ocean trench).  Enjoy!

tallest-mountain-to-deepest-ocean-trench-infographic

Are You in Good Health?!

August 20, 2017

Do you know where your state ranks on the percentage of adults 65+ who say that their health is either “excellent” or “very good?”  Based upon a “Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey” from 2014, here are the states with the “healthiest” seniors versus the “least healthy” (based upon self-reports, of course).

Healthiest States
1. New Hampshire (51%)
2. Maine (50%)
2. Vermont (50%)
2. Colorado (50%)
5. Minnesota (48%)
6. Connecticut (47%)
6. Washington (47%)
6. Oregon (47%)
6. Alaska (47%)
10. Idaho (46%)
10. Nebraska (46%)
10. Wisconsin (46%)
10. Massachusetts (46%)

Least Healthy States
1. Alabama (30%)
2. Arkansas (33%)
3. West Virginia (34%)
3. Kentucky (34%)
3. Mississippi (34%)
3. Louisiana (34%)
7. Tennessee (35%)
7. Oklahoma (35%)
9. Indiana (38%)
9. Texas (38%)
9. Georgia (38%)
9. South Carolina (38%)
9. Hawaii (38%)

Source: “”Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey,” 2014 and AARP Bulletin, July-August 2017, p. 46

Let’s Not Be Idle!

May 22, 2017

Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial for a variety of reasons . . .

  • Control Your Weight.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.
  • Reduce your risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.
  • Reduce Your Risk of Some Cancers.
  • Strengthen Your Bones and Muscles.
  • Improve Your Mental Health and Mood.

So, how active are you?  Here are the best and the worst states by the percentage of people who are over 50 years of age who engage in NO physical activity whatsoever . . .

States with the lowest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Colorado (18%)
2. Oregon (20%)
2. Washington (20%)
4. Idaho (21%)
5. Vermont (22%)

States with the highest percentage of non-active seniors:
1. Arkansas (39%)
2. Mississippi (36%)
3. Oklahoma (35%)
3. Kentucky (35%)
4. Louisiana (34%)
4. West Virginia (34%)

Source: May 2017 AARP Bulletin; 2014 survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; numbers are rounded; respondents reported activity level over the previous month.

“Party On, Wayne . . . !”

December 31, 2016

On this, the eve of the new year, what better quotation to reference than the title of this post from the epic comedy “Wayne’s World” (1992).  Let this also serve as a reminder though that as you find yourself partying this evening . . . exercise common sense and moderation, and if you do overdo it on the consumption of alcohol, don’t even think about driving.

Allow me to also share with you the list of the states with the most and the least number (percentage) of senior adults (age 65+) who report either binge drinking or chronic drinking.  But before we get to the list, how about definitions of “binge” and “chronic” drinking?

Binge drinking is defined as five (5) or more drinks on one occasion within the last month (for men) or four (4) or more drinks (for women).

Chronic drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day (for men) or one drink per day (for women).

Highest percentage
1. Wisconsin (11.1%)
2. District of Columbia (9/8%)
3. Nevada (9.2%)
4. Hawaii (9.1%)
5. Oregon (9.0%)
6. Florida (8.9%)
6. Alaska (8.9%)
8. Washington (8.6%)
9. Vermont (8.5%)
9. California (8.5%)

Lowest percentage
1. Tennessee (2.9%)
2. Mississippi (3.2%)
3. West Virginia (3.3%)
4. Oklahoma (3.4%)
4. Utah (3.4%)
6. Kentucky (4.0%)
7. Alabama (4.3%)
8. Missouri (4.7%)
9. Kansas (4.9%)
9. Georgia (4.9%)
9. North Carolina (4.9%)
9. Indiana (4.9%)

Source: AARP Bulletin (December 2016) and the 2016 “America’s Health Rankings Senior Report.”

Ah, the Monthly Mortgage!

December 10, 2016

Obviously we all know how hard we work and how long it takes for us to individually put in enough hours to pay our mortgages.  But do you know how you compare to others in your state?  Around the country?  This month’s issue of the AARP Bulletin has the comparisons by state of the average number of hours you need to work to cover your monthly mortgage.

Most hours
1. Hawaii (88)
2. District of Columbia (83)
3. California (78)
4. Colorado (67)
4. Oregon (67)

Least hours
1. Ohio (31)
2. Michigan (32)
3. Indiana (33)
4. Iowa (34)
4. Missouri (34)
4. Kansas (34)

Source: AARP Bulletin and gobankingrates.com