Posts Tagged ‘The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate’

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Nine!

February 7, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin lanuginosus, meaning “downy,” from lanugo, meaning “wooliness,” + –osus, and adjectival suffix meaning “abouinding in.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Where we had expected to find a scaly outer skin, we were surprised to find the creature had a lanuginose covering from neck to tail.”

lanuginose

\ luhnoo-juh-nohs, –nyoo– \, adjective;

1.  covered with lanugo, or soft, downy hairs.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

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Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Eight!

January 17, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin iocundus or iucundus, meaning “pleasant”; from the infinitive iuvare, meaning “to assist,” + –cundus, and adjectival suffix.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“The seriousness of the situation was leavened by his jocund repartee, which never stopped for a moment.”

jocund

jokuh nd, joh-kuh nd \, adjective;

1. cheerful; merry; blithe; glad.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Seven!

December 27, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin im-, meaning “not,” + pecuniosus, meaning “moneyed, well-off.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Strangely, the only happy branch of our family is the impecunious one, whose members never seem to worry about their apparent lack of cash.”

impecunious

\ im-pi-kyoo-nee-uh s \, adjective;

1. having little or no money; penniless; poor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Six!

December 5, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin lanuginosus, meaning “downy,” from lanugo, meaning “wooliness, + -osus, an adjectival suffix meaning “abounding in.”   Also given as lanuginous.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Where we had expected to find a scaly outer skin, we were surprised to find the creature had a lanuginose covering from neck to tail.”

lanuginose

\ luhnoo-juh-nohs, –nyoo– \, adjective;

1.  covered with lanugo, or soft, downy hairs.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Five!

November 14, 2017

Here is a word possibly from the Middle English knorre, meaning “a knot,” + -ed, an adjectival suffix.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Without the knurled edge, neither my wife nor I would ever have been able to open a jar of martini olives.”

knurled

\ nurld \, adjective;

1. having small ridges on the edge or surface; milled.
2. having knurls or knots; gnarled.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Four!

October 24, 2017

Halloween is only a week away, so here is a word from Middle English hagge, meaning “witch,” + ridden, a combining form meaning “overwhelmed by,” part participle of “to ride.”   As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“My hagridden nights, populated with shrieking witches, are leaving me tormented and unrefreshed, scarcely able to face the demands of a new day.”

hagridden

\ hag-rid-n \, adjective;

1.  worried or tormented, as by a witch.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Three!

October 3, 2017

Here is a colloquial word for which the exact origin is unknown.  It could quite probably be a euphemism for buggered.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“After the disappointing news, the poor man spat out ‘I’ll be jiggered,’ and fell silent, apparently feeling better because he ha taken a load off his mind.”

jiggered

\ jig-erd \, adjective;

1.  confounded; damned

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Two!

September 12, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin idoneous, meaning “fit, proper, suitable.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“On the basis of their idoneous qualifications, all three finalists were given four-month appointments as summer interns to determine how they would respond to the demands of the working environment.”

idoneous

\ ahy-doh-nee-uh s \, adjective;

  1.  appropriate; fit; suitable; apt.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-One!

August 22, 2017

Here is a word from the Greek glyptikós, meaning “of engraving,” from the infinitive glyphein meaning “to engrave.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“As the number of highly publicized jewel thefts increased, there arose a demand for persons skilled in creating tiny glyptic identifications that would thwart thieves.”

glyptic

\ glip-tik \, adjective;

 1.  of or relating to carving or engraving on gems or the like.

noun
2.  the act or process of producing glyptic ornaments.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty!

August 2, 2017

The grape harvest is still several weeks away, but I ran across this word that certainly helps define “when the time is right,” so to speak.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“In late August, the field’s purple grapes were suddenly covered with a glaucous powder, signaling to all believers that the field could be harvested in three or four weeks.”

glaucous

\ glaw-kuh s \, adjective;

1.  light bluish-green or greenish-blue.
2.  Botany. covered with a whitish bloom, as a plum.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.