Posts Tagged ‘The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Nineteen!

July 11, 2017

Here is a word from the English galacto-, a combining form meaning “milk,” and -poietic, a combining form meaning “making.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“She was given what they said would be a galactopoietic diet, suggesting it would help her nurse the baby successfully.”

galactopoietic

guh-lak-tuh-poi-et-ik \, adjective;

1.  increasing the secretion of milk.

noun
2.  a galactopoietic agent or medicine.

 

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Seventeen!

May 30, 2017

Here is another word that I have never actually run across in any book I have read to date, but you just never know when you will encounter a new word or two.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“The eagle has a falcate beak which enables the bird to pull apart its prey while sailing high in the sky.”

falcate

\ fal-keyt or fal-key-tid \, adjective;

 1. curved like a scythe or sickle; hooked; falciform.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Sixteen!

May 9, 2017

Here is another word that I have never actually run across in any book I have read to date, but you just never know when you will encounter a new word or two.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“I will never again buy a house that is cursed with a declivitous driveway, no matter how attractive the price.”

declivitous

\ dih-kliv-i-tuh s \, adjective;

 1.  having a somewhat steep downward slope.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Fourteen!

March 28, 2017
Sometimes you run across words that are highly descriptive!  Here’s one that takes us back to Bacchanalian orgies.   Per The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate, “A Supreme Court justice is reputed to have said of ithyphallic writing, ‘I can’t define it, but I know it when I see it.'”

ithyphallic

\ ith-uhfal-ik \, adjective;
1. of or relating to the phallus carried in ancient festivals of Bacchus.
2. grossly indecent; obscene.
3. (Classical Prosody). noting or pertaining to any of several meters employed in hymns sung in Bacchic processions.

noun;
4. a poem in ithyphallic meter.
5. an indecent poem.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirteen!

March 7, 2017

Here’s another gem.  I really love my “highly selective” books (dictionary, thesaurus, golden adjectives) “for the extraordinarily literate.”  Here’s a sentence using a word I have never before encountered . . . but may start using myself: “An unusually long rainy season made the region especially uliginous that year.”

uliginous

yoo-lijuh-nuh s \, adjective;

  1.  swampy; slimy; of marshes or water-logged places

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twelve!

February 7, 2017

How many times have you attended a conference or event expecting to hear a stimulating speaker only to be disappointed by discovering he is nothing more than a magniloquent bore?  Far too often, I’m afraid.  Alas.

magniloquent

\ mag-niluh-kwuh nt \, adjective;

  1.  speaking or expressed in a lofty or grandiose style; pompous; bombastic; boastful.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Eight!

November 14, 2016

Happy Monday!  Here is an adjective that you will probably not hear very often, but classy nonetheless.  So as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Erhlich, I found this sentence:”Ethel was well liked and admired by her coworkers for her concinnous manners.”

concinnous

\ kuh n-sinuh s \, adjective;

1.  characterized by concinnity; elegant; harmonious; stylistically congruous.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Erhlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Seven!

October 10, 2016

Happy Monday!  Here’s a new word for my vocabulary . . . “There was no doubt he was interested only in zaftig females, whose overflowing ripeness would prove a fitting complement for his own carefully tended masculinity.”

zaftig

\ zahf-tik, -tig \, adjective;

From the Yiddish zaftik, meaning “juicy, succulent;” from German saftig, meaning “juicy.” Of a woman: sexy; plump; well-proportioned; curvaceous.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Six!

September 19, 2016

Happy Monday!  Here’s a new word for my vocabulary . . . “The star’s splendid, coruscant gown reflected the brilliant lights of Oscar night and brought rounds of applause as she made her way into the theater.”

coruscant

\ kuhruhs-kuh nt, kawruh s-, kor– \, adjective;

  1. sparkling or gleaming; scintillating; coruscating.

Related words: coruscate (verb) and coruscation (noun).

Amazing Adjectives, Number Five!

August 29, 2016

Happy Monday!  “During the season of winter colds, our concerts were punctuated with annoying emunctory activity.”

emunctory

\ ih-muhngk-tuh-ree \, noun;

1.  a part or organ of the body, as the skin or a kidney, that functions in carrying off waste products.
adjective
2.  excretory (of the blowing of the nose).
Source: www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.