Posts Tagged ‘The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate’

Yarn!

August 8, 2017

For those of us who knit, crochet, or weave, yarn is a common material for these activities.  But you can certainly use some other descriptive and less common words if you’d like some variety (see below).

yarn

\ yahrn \, noun;

1.  thread made of natural or synthetic fibers and used for knitting and weaving.
2.  a continuous strand or thread made from glass, metal, plastic, etc.
3.  the thread, in the form of a loosely twisted aggregate of fibers, as of hemp, of which rope is made (rope yarn)
4.  a tale, especially a long story of adventure or incredible happenings

verb
(used without object)
5.  Informal. to spin a yarn; tell stories.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Let’s Get a Translation!

July 18, 2017

During my previous career in law enforcement, I was able to speak a little Spanish and communicate on the simple stuff.   But very now and then, an actual interpreter with more advanced language skills was required.  And while everyone knows and understands what an interpreter is, there is quite the variety of other words that you could use instead (see below).

interpreter

\ in-tur-pri-ter \, noun;

1.  a person who interprets.
2.  a person who provides an oral translation between speakers who speak different languages.
3.  Computers.
a.  hardware or software that transforms one statement at a time of program written in a high-level language into a sequence of machine actions and executes the statement immediately before going on to transform the next statement.
Compare compiler (def 2).
b.  an electromechanical device that reads the patterns of holes in punched cards and prints the same data on the cards, so that they can be read more conveniently by people.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

A Dedication!

June 27, 2017

I think it is fair to say that we’ve all seen an occasional “inscription” inside a book, or possibly on a gravestone.  And while “inscription” seems to be a fairly common word, you can certainly use some other descriptive and less common words to get the point across as well, if you so choose (see below).

inscription

\ in-skrip-shuh n \, noun;

1.  something inscribed.
2.  a historical, religious, or other record cut, impressed, painted, or written on stone, brick, metal, or other hard surface.
3.  a brief, usually informal dedication, as of a book or a work of art.
4.  a note, as a dedication, that is written and signed by hand in a book.
5.  the act of inscribing.
6.  Pharmacology. the part of a prescription indicating the drugs and the amounts to be mixed.

British.1.  an issue of securities or stocks.
2.  a block of shares in a stock, as bought or sold by one person.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Just a Bit Wordy!

June 6, 2017

Some people just have the gift of gab.  They can talk incessantly and usually use way too many words to get their point across.  And while “wordy” is a very descriptive and easily understood word, you can certainly use other words to get the point across (see below).

wordy

\ wur-dee \, adjective;

1. characterized by or given to the use of many, or too many, words; verbose
2. pertaining to or consisting of words; verbal.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Permeate!

April 25, 2017

While I like this word and use it on occasion, I am certainly open to using some of the synonyms below (when appropriate).  Even as these words are considered synonyms, there are always slight variations of meaning depending upon how they are used.  So, by all means, add some of these other words to your vocabulary, but don’t necessarily discard permeate completely.

permeate

\ pur-mee-eyt \, noun;

1.  to pass into or through every part of
2.  to penetrate through the pores, interstices, etc., of

3.  to be diffused through; pervade; saturate


verb
(used without object)
, permeated, permeating.
4.  to become diffused; penetrate

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Excrement!

March 14, 2017

I’m going to assume that we all know or are familiar with some of the slang words for excrement (shit, crap, turd, dung, etc.).  However, were you aware of these other useful synonyms that you might just find occasion to use?

excrement

\ ek-skruh-muh nt \, noun;

1. waste matter discharged from the body, especially feces.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

You Say “Vestibule . . . !”

December 12, 2016

But there are so many other words that could be used instead.

vestibule

ves-tuh-byool \, noun;

According to http://www.dictionary.com, a vestibule is defined as:

1. a passage, hall, or antechamber between the outer door and the interior parts of a house or building.
2. Railroads. an enclosed space at the end of a passenger car, serving as a sheltered entrance to the car from another car or from outside the train.
3. Anatomy, Zoology. any of various cavities or hollows regarded as forming an approach or entrance to another cavity or space, as that of the internal ear.
But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

A Jar By Any Other Name!

November 21, 2016

Next time you are thinking about using the word “jar,” here are a host of other words you could use instead.  Of course, each and every one of these will probably have a specific use, so you may just want to stick with “jar.”  Enjoy!

alabastron
albarello
amphora
aryballos
askos
cymaise
dolium
hydria
kalpis
lekythos
loutrophoros
pelike
pithos
potiche
psykter
stamnos

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Just a Little Zest!

October 3, 2016

Happy Monday!  I run across the word “zest” most frequently when I’m cooking.  But I have also encountered it with regard to the concept of liveliness as well as in an old television commercial for the soap product (zest-fully clean).   Some of the standard definitions for “zest” include:

  1. keen relish; hearty enjoyment
  2. an agreeable flavor imparted to something
  3. anything added to impart flavor, enhance one’s appreciation, etc.
  4. interest; charm
  5. liveliness or energy; animating spirit
  6. the peel, especially the thin outer peel, of a citrus fruit used for flavoring

So, as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate I ran across all of these other ways to say “zest.”  Enjoy!

For additional synonyms or related words for “zest,” check out this list.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

It Truly Was Accidental!

September 12, 2016

Happy Monday!  Accidents do happen, but are they always accidental?  By definition, I would certainly think so.  A couple of the standard definitions for “accidental” include:

  1. happening by chance, unintentionally, or unexpectedly
  2. incidental; subsidiary

So, as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate I ran across all of these other ways to say “accidental.”  Enjoy!

Other, more common, synonyms could include: chance, fluky, coincidental, casual, random,unexpected, unforeseen, unanticipated, unlooked-for, unintentional,unintended, inadvertent, unplanned, unpremeditated, unthinking, unwitting, incidental, unimportant, by the way, by the by, supplementary, subsidiary, subordinate, secondary, accessory, peripheral, tangential, extraneous, extrinsic, irrelevant, nonessential, inessential.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.