Posts Tagged ‘Thesaurus’

Close to “Ideal!”

October 10, 2017

The word ideal is a common enough a word that it probably does not require a definition.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a few other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used when discussing the topic of ideal.  Enjoy!

ideal

\ ahy-deeuh l, ahy-deel \,

noun
1. a conception of something in its perfection.
2. a standard of perfection or excellence.
3. a person or thing conceived as embodying such a conception or conforming to such a
standard, and taken as a model for imitation.
4. an ultimate object or aim of endeavor, especially one of high or noble character.
5. something that exists only in the imagination.
6. Mathematics. a subring of a ring, any element of which when multiplied by any
element of the ring results in an element of the subring.

adjective
7. conceived as constituting a standard of perfection or excellence.
8. regarded as perfect of its kind.
9. existing only in the imagination; not real or actual.
10. advantageous; excellent; best.
11. based upon an ideal or ideals.
12. Philosophy.  pertaining to a possible state of affairs considered as highly desirable, or pertaining to or of the nature ofidealism.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

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Rambling!

May 16, 2017

I can certainly ramble with the best of them (as in definition #4 below), but according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are many more options for words (see below) that I could use to further extend my vocabulary and offer some variety in my usage.  Enjoy!

rambling

\ ram-bling \, adjective;

1.  aimlessly wandering
2.  taking an irregular course; straggling

3.  spread out irregularly in various directions
4.  straying from one subject to another; desultory

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Permeate!

April 25, 2017

While I like this word and use it on occasion, I am certainly open to using some of the synonyms below (when appropriate).  Even as these words are considered synonyms, there are always slight variations of meaning depending upon how they are used.  So, by all means, add some of these other words to your vocabulary, but don’t necessarily discard permeate completely.

permeate

\ pur-mee-eyt \, noun;

1.  to pass into or through every part of
2.  to penetrate through the pores, interstices, etc., of

3.  to be diffused through; pervade; saturate


verb
(used without object)
, permeated, permeating.
4.  to become diffused; penetrate

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Excrement!

March 14, 2017

I’m going to assume that we all know or are familiar with some of the slang words for excrement (shit, crap, turd, dung, etc.).  However, were you aware of these other useful synonyms that you might just find occasion to use?

excrement

\ ek-skruh-muh nt \, noun;

1. waste matter discharged from the body, especially feces.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

You Say “Vestibule . . . !”

December 12, 2016

But there are so many other words that could be used instead.

vestibule

ves-tuh-byool \, noun;

According to http://www.dictionary.com, a vestibule is defined as:

1. a passage, hall, or antechamber between the outer door and the interior parts of a house or building.
2. Railroads. an enclosed space at the end of a passenger car, serving as a sheltered entrance to the car from another car or from outside the train.
3. Anatomy, Zoology. any of various cavities or hollows regarded as forming an approach or entrance to another cavity or space, as that of the internal ear.
But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Gluteus Maximus!

October 23, 2016

Happy Sunday!  Anatomy and Physiology was one of the most amazing classes I have ever taken.  And while I have not explored a career in medicine or health, I can still remember many of the terms.  The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle of the buttocks.   Some of the standard definitions for “buttocks” include:

Usually, buttocks.

  • (in humans) either of the two fleshy protuberances forming the lower and back part of the trunk. 
  • (in animals) the rump.

Sometimes, buttocks. Nautical. the after most portion of a hull above the water line and in front of the rudder, merging with the run below the water line.

So, as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate I ran across all of these other ways to say “buttocks.”  Enjoy!

Additionally, if you wish to describe someone as having excessively large buttocks, use steatopygic; and for having well-shaped buttocks, callipygian.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Just a Little Zest!

October 3, 2016

Happy Monday!  I run across the word “zest” most frequently when I’m cooking.  But I have also encountered it with regard to the concept of liveliness as well as in an old television commercial for the soap product (zest-fully clean).   Some of the standard definitions for “zest” include:

  1. keen relish; hearty enjoyment
  2. an agreeable flavor imparted to something
  3. anything added to impart flavor, enhance one’s appreciation, etc.
  4. interest; charm
  5. liveliness or energy; animating spirit
  6. the peel, especially the thin outer peel, of a citrus fruit used for flavoring

So, as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate I ran across all of these other ways to say “zest.”  Enjoy!

For additional synonyms or related words for “zest,” check out this list.

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

And Now, a Little Criticism!

August 22, 2016

Happy Monday!  It would seem that no one likes a critic (or likes to be criticized), yet everyone seems to constantly be quick to criticize.  So, as I was perusing my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate I ran across all of these other ways to say “criticize.”  Enjoy!

Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

A Basin By Any Other Name!

August 1, 2016

Happy Monday!  Next time you run across a rather simple or basic word such as “basin,” consider using one of these extraordinary synonyms instead . . .

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Utterly Hopeless!

June 20, 2016

According to http://www.dictionary.com, abject has been defined as

1. utterly hopeless, miserable, humiliating, or wretched
2. contemptible; despicable; base-spirited
3. shamelessly servile; slavish.
4. Obsolete. cast aside.
But if you are looking for a different word to use, check out these synonyms (courtesy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich):
craven, fawning, ignominious
Source: http://www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich (page 1).