Posts Tagged ‘Trivia’

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-Five!

May 26, 2017

This week’s fact comes under the category of “Literature.”  Do you happen to know what the “wherefore,” from “wherefore art thou, Romeo?” means? Hint: it doesn’t mean where.

The short answer: it means why?

The longer answer: spoken by Juliet whilst on the balcony, she is lamenting the antagonism between their two families (Juliet’s Capulets and Romeo’s Montagues).  Juliet is basically asking Romeo “why did you have to be a Montague?

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong, by Dr. Rod L. Evans.

Grand Expedition!

May 24, 2017

Did you know that on this day, May 24th (in 1869), was the beginning of the first exploration of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado by a man other than a Native American?  Major John Wesley Powell left Green River City (above the head of the Colorado River) with nine men and proceeded through the canyon and emerged from the lower end on August 29, 1869.  Only five of the nine men who started the trip completed the trip.

Some other “firsts” for today throughout history include:

  • Commercial telegraph service (1844)
  • State adoption law to consider the interests of the child (1851)
  • Civil War combat action that earned the Medal of Honor (1861)
  • Union Officer killed in the Civil War (1861)
  • Artillery fire to be directed from the air (1862)
  • Army field telegraph used in warfare (1862)
  • Steel arch bridge (1874)
  • National banking association (1875)
  • Anti-saloon organization (1893)
  • Public garage (1899)
  • Oil journal (1902)
  • Strike settlement mediated by the federal Department of Labor (1913)
  • Air combat arm of the Army (1918)
  • Croix de Guerre awarded to an American (1918)
  • Air-conditioned train (1931)
  • Baseball game at night by major league teams (1935)
  • Food-O-Mat (1945)
  • House with a built-in nuclear bomb shelter (1959)
  • Spy satellite (1960)
  • Transatlantic supersonic jet service (1976)
  • Senator to change political control of the Senate by switching parties (2001)

Source: Famous First Facts (6th ed.) by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-Four!

May 19, 2017

Today’s fun fact(s) revolve around camels.  Did you know that . . .

  • camels have three eyelids? (Real Fact #5)
  • camels’ milk does not curdle? (Real Fact #14)
  • despite its hump, a camel has a straight spine? (Real Fact #49)
  •  a camel can drink 25 gallons of water in less than three minutes? (Real Fact #714)
  • wild camels once roamed Arizona’s wild deserts? (Real Fact #848)

Source: http://www.snapple.com/real-facts

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-Three!

May 12, 2017

This week’s fact comes under the category of “Science.”  Do you happen to know the source of the bubbles in champagne?  No, it is not carbon dioxide.

The short answer: dirt, dust, or lint!

The longer answer: carbon dioxide molecules would evaporate without something causing the bubbles to form.  This something was originally believed to be the slight imperfections with the very glass itself.  However, it has since been discovered that the bubbles form on microscopic particles of dust/dirt within the glass which act as condensation nuclei for the dissolved carbon dioxide.

Who knew!  Even straight out of the dishwasher, my glasses are filthy!

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong, by Dr. Rod L. Evans.

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-Two!

May 5, 2017

Did you know that the largest pyramid in the world in not located in Egypt?  Do you know which country in the has the most pyramids?  Again, it would not be Egypt (the country “known” for its pyramids).

The world’s largest pyramid is actually in Mexico (Real Fact #174)!  (Happy Cinco de Mayo!)  The Great Pyramid of Cholula, also known as Tlachihualtepetl, represents a huge complex located in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico.  This pyramid is 63 miles south-east of Mexico City and stands nearly 180 feet tall with a 1,300′ x 1,300′ base.

Source: http://www.snapple.com/real-facts/

And, the country of Sudan has 220 pyramids still in existence, nearly three-times tEgypt Monument Pyramids Giza Archeologyhe number of pyramids in Egypt.  Egypt only has about eighty (80) pyramids, but includes one of the largest and best preserved: the Great Pyramid of Giza which is considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Photo courtesy of http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com

 

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-One!

April 28, 2017

Today’s fun fact will come from the category “food.”  Do you know after whom was the dish eggs Benedict  named?

They were NOT names after the American Revolutionary War traitor, Benedict Arnold, but rather Samuel Benedict, who, in 1894 ordered bacon and poached eggs on toast with Hollandaise sauce at New York’s Waldorf Astoria hotel.  Instead of the bacon and toast, he received ham on an English muffin and a new breakfast sensation was born.

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong by Rod L. Evans.

Breaking News!

April 24, 2017

On this day (in 1936) engineers from the RCA-Victor company provided the pictures/footage of firemen answering an alarm call in Camden, New Jersey.  This represents the first unscheduled event to be televised as it occurred.  It was shown in green tint, 5×7 inches, 24 pictures per second, on a 343-line screen.

Other “firsts” for April 24th include the following:

  • American naval victory in British waters during the Revolutionary War (1778)
  • College named after an American president (1783)
  • Health board established by a city (1795)
  • Docks owned by a state ((1863)
  • Organization to offer free lunches for the poor and sick (1873)
  • Medical society for African-Americans (1884)
  • African-American Catholic priest assigned to work in the United States (1886)
  • Round-the-world solo sailing journey (1895)
  • Skyscraper higher than 750 feet (1913)
  • Joint stock land bank (1917)
  • Army general to fly over enemy lines (1917)
  • Catholic nuns in a cloistered community (1922)
  • Fathometer (1928)
  • Pipeless organ (1934)
  • Glider commercial freight service (1946)
  • African-American professional basketball player (1950)
  • Civilian pilot wounded in Vietnam (1954)
  • Coast-to-coast telecast by satellite (1962)

Source: Famous First Facts (6th ed.) by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty!

April 21, 2017

The “heart” of the matter.  Today’s facts will center on unique facts about the heart.  Were you aware that . . .

  • a hummingbird’s heart beats 1,400 times per minute? (Real Fact #127)
  • the blue whale’s heart is the size of a small car? (Real Fact #232)
  • ancient Egyptians believed the “vein of love” ran from the third finger on the left hand to the heart?  (Real Fact #309)
  • the common garden worm has five pairs of hearts (Real Fact #750)
  • women’s hearts typically beat faster than men’s hearts?  (Real Fact #829)
  • the King of Hearts is the only king without a mustache? (Real Fact #1012)
  • an octopus has three hearts?  (Real Fact #1031)

Source: http://www.snapple.com/real-facts

Merely a Coincidence?!

April 20, 2017

Do you know the connections (or similarities) between Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy (and their assassinations)?  Are these merely coincidences or is this a part of something bigger?

  • Lincoln was elected in 1860
  • Kennedy was elected in 1960
  • Each name has seven letters
  • Both Presidents were slain on a Friday
  • Both were slain in the presence of their wives
  • Both were directly concerned with Civil Rights
  • Both Presidents had had the legality of their elections contested
  • Kennedy’s secretary, Lincoln, warned him not to go to Dallas
  • Lincoln’s secretary, Kennedy, warned him not to go to the theater
  • Both of their successors were named Johnson
    • Andrew Johnson
    • Lyndon Johnson
    • Each name contains thirteen (13) letters
    • Both served in the U.S. Senate
    • Both were southern Democrats
    • Andrew Johnson was born in 1808
    • Lyndon Johnson was born in 1908
  • Booth and Oswald were both southerners favoring unpopular ideas
  • Booth shot Lincoln in a theater and hid in a warehouse
  • Oswald shot Kennedy from a warehouse and hid in a theater
  • Booth and Oswald were murdered before their trials could be arranged
  • Lincoln and Kennedy were carried in death on the same caisson
  • Booth and Oswald were born 100 years apart
  • John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald, each name has fifteen (15) letters

Fun Fact Friday, Number Nineteen!

April 14, 2017

Today’s fun fact comes from the category: American History.

Do you know what was the longest war fought by the United States?

The longest war fought by the United States was the war against the Apache nation (forty-six [46] years) and ended in 1886 with the surrender of Geronimo in New Mexico.

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong by Dr. Rod L. Evans.