Posts Tagged ‘Vocabulary’

Brilliance!

September 19, 2017

“In addition to its brilliance, vermilion is a pigment of great intensity and durability.” (www.dictionary.com)

brilliance

\ bril-yuh ns \, noun;

1.  great brightness; luster
2.  excellence or distinction; conspicuous talent, mental ability, etc.
3.  splendor, elegance, or magnificence

4.  Optics. that luminance of a body consisting of its saturation and brightness.
But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

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Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-Two!

September 12, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin idoneous, meaning “fit, proper, suitable.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“On the basis of their idoneous qualifications, all three finalists were given four-month appointments as summer interns to determine how they would respond to the demands of the working environment.”

idoneous

\ ahy-doh-nee-uh s \, adjective;

  1.  appropriate; fit; suitable; apt.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Okay, That’s Settled Then!

September 5, 2017

I have never had the occasion to use this word previously, and I certainly never would have guessed to put the stress on the second syllable (when pronouncing), but alas. I have experienced a short quietus several years ago, when I was finishing up my law enforcement career, but before I had begun my academic librarian career.

quietus

\ kwahy-ee-tuh s \, noun;

1.  a finishing stroke; anything that effectually ends or settles
2.  discharge or release from life
3.  a period of retirement or inactivity

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Talk About Abuse!

August 29, 2017

The word abuse is certainly a simple “run-of-the-mill” word.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a few other synonyms (see below) that could be used when discussing the topic of abuse (depending on your usage, of course).  Enjoy!

abuse

\ verb uhbyooz; noun uhbyoos \,

verb (used with object), abused, abusing.
1.  to use wrongly or improperly; misuse
2.  to treat in a harmful, injurious, or offensive way

3.  to speak insultingly, harshly, and unjustly to or about; revile; malign.
4.  to commit sexual assault upon.
5.  Obsolete. to deceive or mislead.
noun
6.  wrong or improper use; misuse
7.  harshly or coarsely insulting language
8.  bad or improper treatment; maltreatment

9.  a corrupt or improper practice or custom
10.  rape or sexual assault.
11.  Obsolete. deception.
Idioms
12.  abuse oneself, to masturbate.

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty-One!

August 22, 2017

Here is a word from the Greek glyptikós, meaning “of engraving,” from the infinitive glyphein meaning “to engrave.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“As the number of highly publicized jewel thefts increased, there arose a demand for persons skilled in creating tiny glyptic identifications that would thwart thieves.”

glyptic

\ glip-tik \, adjective;

 1.  of or relating to carving or engraving on gems or the like.

noun
2.  the act or process of producing glyptic ornaments.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Name That Weevil!

August 16, 2017

While today’s word has been included in numerous English-language dictionaries for years, it had never been included in the Oxford English Dictionary until recently.  Zyzzyva is now recognized by the Oxford English Dictionary and has the distinction of being the very last entry in the OED.

zyzzyva

zizuh-vuh \, noun;

  1.  any of various South American weevils of the genus Zyzzyva, often destructive to plants.

Yarn!

August 8, 2017

For those of us who knit, crochet, or weave, yarn is a common material for these activities.  But you can certainly use some other descriptive and less common words if you’d like some variety (see below).

yarn

\ yahrn \, noun;

1.  thread made of natural or synthetic fibers and used for knitting and weaving.
2.  a continuous strand or thread made from glass, metal, plastic, etc.
3.  the thread, in the form of a loosely twisted aggregate of fibers, as of hemp, of which rope is made (rope yarn)
4.  a tale, especially a long story of adventure or incredible happenings

verb
(used without object)
5.  Informal. to spin a yarn; tell stories.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some options (some better than others) to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Twenty!

August 2, 2017

The grape harvest is still several weeks away, but I ran across this word that certainly helps define “when the time is right,” so to speak.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“In late August, the field’s purple grapes were suddenly covered with a glaucous powder, signaling to all believers that the field could be harvested in three or four weeks.”

glaucous

\ glaw-kuh s \, adjective;

1.  light bluish-green or greenish-blue.
2.  Botany. covered with a whitish bloom, as a plum.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

I’ve Changed My Mind!

July 26, 2017

I have never actually encountered this word before and according to the difficulty index, few English speakers likely know this word.  Following weeks of negotiations, imagine our surprise at the abrupt, 11th-hour volte-face.

volte-face

\ volt-fahs, vohlt-; French vawltuhfas \, noun;

  1.  a turnabout, especially a reversal of opinion or policy.
  2.  a complete change of one’s attitude toward something.

Sources: www.dictionary.com and The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Nineteen!

July 11, 2017

Here is a word from the English galacto-, a combining form meaning “milk,” and -poietic, a combining form meaning “making.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“She was given what they said would be a galactopoietic diet, suggesting it would help her nurse the baby successfully.”

galactopoietic

guh-lak-tuh-poi-et-ik \, adjective;

1.  increasing the secretion of milk.

noun
2.  a galactopoietic agent or medicine.

 

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.