Posts Tagged ‘Vocabulary’

Newfangled!

April 17, 2019

Back in the day, we had sugar.  Then came the era of artificial sweeteners in an attempt to lessen sugar consumption.  And now there are even more neoteric alternatives to sugar like Stevia., Xylitol, Erythritol, or Yacon Syrup.

neoteric

\ nee-uhter-ik \, adjective;

  1. modern; new; recent.
  2. newfangled.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

I Knew We Were Related!

April 10, 2019

My family is not overly large, but I have “kin” all over the place although they seem to be centered in and around the Great Lakes (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Illinois, and Connecticut).

kinship

\ kin-ship \, noun;

  1. the state or fact of being of kin; family relationship.
  2. relationship by nature, qualities, etc.; affinity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Nine!

April 3, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin obiurgatorius, meaning “reproachful,” from infinitive obiugare, meaning “to scold, rebuke.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Her objurgatory tone, which she adopted as soon as she knew she had been caught, could reduce me to tears.”

objurgatory

\ ob-jer-geyt-or-ee, uh b-jur-geyt-or-ee \, adjective;

  1. uttering or constituting a scolding or sharp rebuke.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Voldemort Defined By a Word!

March 27, 2019

I am a huge fan of the Harry Potter series (books and movies).  Here is a promotional sentence for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1: “As the film begins, the Ministry of Magic is crumbling in the malefic grip of Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), and Harry has a price on his head.”

malefic

\ muhlef-ik \, adjective;

  1. productive of evil; malign; doing harm; baneful.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Without Life?!

March 20, 2019

While the word “dead” really requires no definition, why not try some of these synonyms occasionally and really impress your friends?

lifeless

\ lahyf-lis \, adjective;

  1. not endowed with life; having no life; inanimate.
  2. destitute of living things.
  3. deprived of life; dead

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Eight!

March 13, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin nescientia, meaning “ignorance”; from ne-, meaning “not,” + scientia, meaning “knowledge.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Only the nescient person, whether an ignoramus or an unbeliever, would take no position at all on matters of such importance.”

nescient

\ neshuh ns, nesh-ee-uh ns, nes-ee- \, adjective;

  1. lack of knowledge; ignorance.
  2. agnosticism.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Slippery Slope, Indeed!

March 6, 2019

Growing up in Michigan, I was quite familiar with black ice on the roadways.  Extreme caution was called for when driving on this lubricious surface.

lubricious

\ loo-brishuhs \, adjective;

  1. slippery; smooth.
  2. oily.
  3. lewd, salacious
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

No Fools Here!

February 27, 2019

I dare say that we all have had an occasional moment or two of foolishness in our lives (having done something lacking good sense or judgment).

foolish

\ foo-lish \, adjective;

  1. resulting from or showing lack of sense; ill-considered; unwise.
  2. lacking forethought or caution.
  3. trifling, insignificant, or paltry.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Seven!

February 20, 2019

Here is a word from the French mal à propos, meaning “inopportune,” literally “badly (suited) to the purpose.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Sara had a knack for choosing malapropos moments for asking personal questions.”

malapropos

\ mal-ap-ruhpoh \, adjective;

  1. inappropriate; out of place; inopportune; untimely.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Japanese Art Form!

February 13, 2019

“Nampo made calligrphies ( calligraphy ) mainly in the tanzaku and kakemono format.”  Once I hang art on the wall, I usually keep it there.  The kakemono format (e.g., like a scroll) allows the work to be displayed when needed, but then rolled up to be stored when not in use.

kakemono

\ kah-kuhmoh-noh; Japanese kah-ke-maw-naw \, noun;

  1. vertical hanging scroll containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.