Posts Tagged ‘Vocabulary’

Let’s Not Slander!

September 12, 2018

My father was of the opinion that if you couldn’t say anything nice, it was best to not say anything at all.  Unfortunately in the world today this practice is seldom followed.  People are being vilified on a regular basis (especially in the court of public opinion via the media and social media outlets).  And, while “vilify” is an awesome word, there are some other synonyms that you could use every now and then.

vilify

\ viluh-fahy \, adjective;

  1. to speak ill of; defame; slander.
  2. Obsoleteto make vile.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Nine!

September 5, 2018

Here is a word from the Medieval Latin diaphanus, and the Greek diaphaínen, meaning “to show through.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate:

“Whether dancers intent on attracting spirited young men chose to wear diaphanous gowns is entirely their own decision.”

diaphanous

\ dahy-afuh-nuh s \, adjective;

  1. very sheer and light; almost completely transparent or translucent.
  2. delicately hazy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Above and Beyond!

August 29, 2018

The movie “Hacksaw Ridge” provides us with a perfect example of today’s word. Private Desmond T. Doss, the only conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor exemplifies supererogate perfectly.  “The medic was a supererogatory hero for running back onto the battlefield to save soldiers after being ordered to withdraw.”

supererogate

\ soo-per-eruh-geyt \, verb;

1. to do more than duty requires.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Not Your Usual Michievousness!

August 22, 2018

Today’s word is fairly common, but there are so many other words one could use to convey the same concept that it seems quite wasteful to not exercise this ability from time to time.

rascal

\ ras-kuh l \, noun;

1. a base, dishonest, or unscrupulous person.
2. a mischievous person or animal.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Eight!

August 16, 2018

Here is a word from the English xeno-, a combining form meaning “alien, strange”; from the Greek xenos, a combining form meaning “a stranger, guest, alien, foreigner.”  The word is completed by the English -morphic, from -morphous, a combining form meaning “having the shape or form of.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It was not until the very end of the expedition that they came upon strata yielding the predicted xenomorphic rock specimens.”

xenomorphic

\ zen-uhmawr-fik, zee-nuh-k \, adjective;

1.  Also, allotriomorphic. Petrography. noting or pertaining to a mineral grain that does  not have its characteristic crystalline form but has form impressed on it by   surrounding grains; anhedral.
2.  in an unusual form; having a strange form.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Live Birth Versus Egg!

August 8, 2018

Today’s word describes animals that produce live babies instead of reproducing through eggs.  And while the category of animals that are viviparous includes mostly mammals, some fish and insects have this trait as well.

viviparous

\ vahy-vip-er-uh s, vi- \, adjective;

1. Zoology. bringing forth living young rather than eggs, as most mammals and some  reptiles and fishes.
2. Botany. producing seeds that germinate on the plant.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

A Little Bulge!

August 2, 2018

Today’s word is another very common word a growth or expansion.  So here are some other ways to swelling that may just “grow on you.”

swelling

\ swel-ing \, noun;

1.  the act of a person or thing that swells.
2.  the condition of being or becoming swollen.
3.  a swollen part; a protuberance or prominence.

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Seven!

July 25, 2018

Here is a word from the Old Norse vaga, meaning “to sway”; from the English wag meaning “mishievous lad; habitual joker.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“My friends mistakenly thought of me as waggish, not realizing that beneath my jocund exterior lay brooding self-doubt.”

waggish

\ vat-ik \, adjective;

1.  like a wag; roguish in merriment and good humor; jocular
2.  characteristic of or befitting a wag

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Diversifying My Vocabulary!

July 23, 2018

I recently discovered an award-winning Irish crime novelist (Adrian McKinty) and read one of his books (The Cold Cold Ground).  I enjoyed it tremendously and am looking forward to reading more of his books.  During the course of my reading, I ran across numerous “new” words that I had not ever encountered before.  Luckily for me, the author included a glossary in the back of the book to help me understand what these new words meant (Irish, slang).

bairn = baby
bap = head
banjaxed = broken/messed up
bog = toilet
charbanc = bus/motor coach
eejit = idiot
fenian = Catholic (derogatory)
ganch = guy/bloke
Jaffa = Protestant (derogatory)
Kesh/Long Kesh = Maze Prison
kit = clothes
muckers = boys
neb = nose
Old Bill = Police
peeler = policeman
pochle = a mess
Proddy = Protestant
sheugh = ditch
sleekit = sly/crafty
taibhse = spirit (Gaelic)
taig = Catholic (derogatory)
Twelfth of July bonfire = a bonfire celebrating the 1690 Battle of the Boyne
wean = kid

Who Knew?!

July 19, 2018

Growing up in a household where homemade bread was the norm, I’m quite familiar with the yeasty smell that would permeate the house during the pre-baking process.  However, I was totally unaware of the many other definitions of yeasty.  Now I know.

yeasty

\ uhk-sawr-ee-uh s, –sohr-, uhg-zawr-, -zohr- \, adjective;

1. of, containing, or resembling yeast.
2. frothy; foamy.
3. youthful; exuberant; ebullient.
4. trifling; frivolous.
5. characterized by agitation, excitement, change, etc.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.