Posts Tagged ‘Vocabulary’

Watch Your Phraseology!

January 16, 2019

According to the Oxford English Dictionary online, the word profane “carried the meaning of either “desecrating what is holy” or “with a secular purpose.” Usage of the term was discovered as early as the 1450s.

profanity

\ pruhfan-i-tee, proh- \, noun;

  1. the quality of being profane; irreverence.
  2. profane conduct or language; a profane act or utterance.
  3. obscenity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Five!

January 9, 2019

Here is a word from the English jackboot, meaning “a popular style of leather boot,” + a suffix signifying a past participle, -ed. As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“When the jackbooted crowd roared into town, women gripped their purses tighter and ordinary men did their best to find shelter without allowing themselves to appear fightened.”

jackbooted

\ jak-boo-tid \, adjective;

  1. wearing jackboots, especially those who ride motorcycles.
  2. brutally and oppressively bullying.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

How Calloused!

January 2, 2019

In our modern, capitalistic (and materialistic) society, we must be continually strive to keep greediness from indurating our hearts to those who are less fortunate.

indurate

\ in-doo-reyt, -dyoo– \, adjective;

  1. to make hard; harden, as rock, tissue, etc.
  2. to make callous, stubborn, or unfeeling.
  3. to inure; accustom.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Uncommonly Common!

December 26, 2018

Some words that you encounter just make you smile.  Then when you discover some of their synonyms, you smile even wider!  Prosaic is one of those words for me.

prosaic

\ proh-zey-ik \, adjective;

  1. commonplace or dull; matter-of-fact or unimaginative.
  2. of or having the character or form of prose, the ordinary form of spoken or written language, rather than of poetry.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Four!

December 19, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin ignescens, present participle of ignescere, meaning “to burst into flames; burn.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“He was blessed with the type of ignescent personality that quickly burst into a five-alarm fire at the slightest provocation.”

ignescent

\ ig-nesuh nt \, adjective;

  1. emitting sparks of fire, as certain stones when struck with steel.
  2. bursting into flame.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Androgynous, Hermaphrodite, Intersex!?

December 12, 2018

All good words for describing a person or animal having both male and female sex organs or other sexual characteristics.  So, how about adding the word “epicene” to your vocabulary?  “The theory was that human nature is essentially epicene and social distinctions based on sex are arbitrarily constructed.” (source: Wikipedia, in their discussion of “gender).

epicene

\ ep-i-seen \, adjective or noun;

  1. belonging to, or partaking of the characteristics of, both sexes.
  2. flaccid; feeble; weak.
  3. effeminate; unmasculine.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Let’s Put an End To . . . !

December 5, 2018

When you look at the etymology of the word quell, the origins are from the concepts of “to kill” (Middle English: quellen, Old English: cwellan), “to torment” (Old Norse: kvelja), and “to vex” (German: quälen).

quell

\ kwel \, adjective;

  1. to suppress; put an end to; extinguish.
  2. to vanquish; subdue.
  3. to quiet or allay (emotions, anxieties, etc.).

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Three!

November 28, 2018

Here is a word from the Greek hermeneútikós, meaning “skilled in interpreting”; from hermeneús, meaning “an interpreter”;  from Hermes, messenger of the gods.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“The hermeneutic skill he showed in his celebrated lecture on interpreting poetry dazzled the entire faculty.”

hermeneutic

\ hur-muhnoo-tik or hur-muhnoo-ti-kuh l; –nyoo– \, adjective;

  1. of or relating to hermeneutics; interpretative; explanatory.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Let Us Not Disparage!

November 21, 2018

The epitome of dirty politics  . . . the use of a canard.  “Before the election, the politician invented a canard about his rival and shared it with the media.”

canard

\ kuhnahrdFrench kanar \, noun;

  1. false or baseless, usually derogatory story, report, or rumor.
  2. Cookeryduck intended or used for food.
  3. Aeronautics.
    1. an airplane that has its horizontal stabilizer and elevators located forward of tthe wing.
    2. Also called canard wing.one of two small lifting wings located in front of the  main wings.
    3. an early airplane having a pusher engine with the rudder and elevator  assembly in front of the wings.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Polite vs. Rude!

November 14, 2018

Here is a quotation I like on politeness versus rudeness.

“It is a wise thing to be polite; consequently, it is a stupid thing to be rude. To make enemies by unnecessary and willful incivility, is just as insane a proceeding as to set your house on fire. For politeness is like a counter–an avowedly false coin, with which it is foolish to be stingy.”   ― Arthur Schopenhauer

rude

\ rood \, adjective;

  1. discourteous or impolite, especially in a deliberate way.
  2. without culture, learning, or refinement.
  3. rough in manners or behavior; unmannerly; uncouth.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com