Posts Tagged ‘Vocabulary’

The Gallows!

February 21, 2018

Back in the day of public executions, the deceased were often times “left on display” for all to see.  An early attempt at deterrence, perhaps.  The means/device for doing so actually has a name (which I recently discovered).  “The executions took place on market days on a hill outside the town, the gibbet somewhat resembling a guillotine.”

gibbet

\ jib-it \, noun;

1.  a gallows with a projecting arm at the top, from which the bodies of criminals were
formerly hung in chains and left suspended after execution. 

verb (used with object)gibbeted, gibbeting.
2.  to hang on a gibbet.
3.  to put to death by hanging on a gibbet.
4.  to hold up to public scorn.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.
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Loving!

February 14, 2018

Happy Valentines Day!  As we ponder the day, the day in which we show our “love” to those close to us, the word “loving” is pretty straightforward.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a couple of other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word loving.  Enjoy!

loving

\ luhv-ing \, adjective;

1.  feeling or showing love; warmly affectionate; fond.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Nine!

February 7, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin lanuginosus, meaning “downy,” from lanugo, meaning “wooliness,” + –osus, and adjectival suffix meaning “abouinding in.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Where we had expected to find a scaly outer skin, we were surprised to find the creature had a lanuginose covering from neck to tail.”

lanuginose

\ luhnoo-juh-nohs, –nyoo– \, adjective;

1.  covered with lanugo, or soft, downy hairs.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Mockingly!

January 30, 2018

Here is yet another word that I had never before encountered that relates to rude, mocking or derisive behavior or comment.  “Julia turned at the fleer and flung a glance of acute anger at her friend.”

fleer

\ fleer \, verb;

verb (used without object)
1.  to grin or laugh coarsely or mockingly.

verb
 (used with object)
2.  to mock or deride.

noun
3.  a fleering look; a jeer or gibe.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Words of Wisdom!

January 24, 2018

Wisdom, so difficult to come by (at times).  I believe William Shakespeare says it best: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”  Wisdom is a pretty common word, but if you are interested in shaking things up a bit for variety, check out some of the synonyms below.

wisdom

\ wiz-duh m \, noun;

1.  the quality or state of being wise; knowledge of what is true or right coupled with just judgment as to action; sagacity, discernment, or insight.
2.  scholarly knowledge or learning.

3.  wise sayings or teachings; precepts.
4.  a wise act or saying.
5.  (initial capital letterDouay Bible. Wisdom of Solomon.

According to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage): amazingly enough, all of the words below use “shivaree” in their definitions.

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Eight!

January 17, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin iocundus or iucundus, meaning “pleasant”; from the infinitive iuvare, meaning “to assist,” + –cundus, and adjectival suffix.  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“The seriousness of the situation was leavened by his jocund repartee, which never stopped for a moment.”

jocund

jokuh nd, joh-kuh nd \, adjective;

1. cheerful; merry; blithe; glad.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Written Correspondence!

January 11, 2018

I ran across as word the other day that was new to me.  A word that will probably slowly fade to disuse as fewer people write actual letters to one another.  The days of pen-pals and epistolary friendships are becoming more and more rare.

epistolary

\ ih-pis-tl-er-ee \, adjective;

1.  contained in or carried on by letters:

2.  of, relating to, or consisting of letters.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Let Me Serenade You!

January 4, 2018

I have not had occasion to serenade anyone lately, but I am certainly open to using some of the synonyms below (when appropriate).  Even as these words are considered synonyms, there are always slight variations in their actual meanings, depending upon how they are used.  So, by all means, add some of these other words to your vocabulary, but don’t necessarily discard serenade completely.

serenade

\ ser-uhneyd \, noun;

1.  complimentary performance of vocal or instrumental music in the open air at night,
     as by a lover under the window of his lady.
2.  a piece of music suitable for such performance.
3.  serenata (def 2).

verb
 (used with or without object)
serenaded, serenading.
4.  to entertain with or perform a serenade.

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage): amazingly enough, all of the words below use “shivaree” in their definitions.

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Seven!

December 27, 2017

Here is a word from the Latin im-, meaning “not,” + pecuniosus, meaning “moneyed, well-off.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Strangely, the only happy branch of our family is the impecunious one, whose members never seem to worry about their apparent lack of cash.”

impecunious

\ im-pi-kyoo-nee-uh s \, adjective;

1. having little or no money; penniless; poor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

It’s Not Just a Mass, Anymore!

December 19, 2017

It has recently become the tradition at many of the Catholic funeral masses I have attended to have an encomiast (or the invitation for any attendee(s) to provide an encomium).  Growing up there was generally a mass, but no eulogies provided (or at least not that I remember) . . . the times they are a changing!

encomiast

\ en-koh-mee-ast, –uh st \, noun;

1.  a person who utters or writes an encomium.
2.  a eulogist.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com