Posts Tagged ‘www.dictionary.com’

Newfangled!

April 17, 2019

Back in the day, we had sugar.  Then came the era of artificial sweeteners in an attempt to lessen sugar consumption.  And now there are even more neoteric alternatives to sugar like Stevia., Xylitol, Erythritol, or Yacon Syrup.

neoteric

\ nee-uhter-ik \, adjective;

  1. modern; new; recent.
  2. newfangled.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

I Knew We Were Related!

April 10, 2019

My family is not overly large, but I have “kin” all over the place although they seem to be centered in and around the Great Lakes (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Illinois, and Connecticut).

kinship

\ kin-ship \, noun;

  1. the state or fact of being of kin; family relationship.
  2. relationship by nature, qualities, etc.; affinity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Voldemort Defined By a Word!

March 27, 2019

I am a huge fan of the Harry Potter series (books and movies).  Here is a promotional sentence for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1: “As the film begins, the Ministry of Magic is crumbling in the malefic grip of Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), and Harry has a price on his head.”

malefic

\ muhlef-ik \, adjective;

  1. productive of evil; malign; doing harm; baneful.
Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich, and http://www.dictionary.com.

Without Life?!

March 20, 2019

While the word “dead” really requires no definition, why not try some of these synonyms occasionally and really impress your friends?

lifeless

\ lahyf-lis \, adjective;

  1. not endowed with life; having no life; inanimate.
  2. destitute of living things.
  3. deprived of life; dead

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Eight!

March 13, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin nescientia, meaning “ignorance”; from ne-, meaning “not,” + scientia, meaning “knowledge.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Only the nescient person, whether an ignoramus or an unbeliever, would take no position at all on matters of such importance.”

nescient

\ neshuh ns, nesh-ee-uh ns, nes-ee- \, adjective;

  1. lack of knowledge; ignorance.
  2. agnosticism.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

No Fools Here!

February 27, 2019

I dare say that we all have had an occasional moment or two of foolishness in our lives (having done something lacking good sense or judgment).

foolish

\ foo-lish \, adjective;

  1. resulting from or showing lack of sense; ill-considered; unwise.
  2. lacking forethought or caution.
  3. trifling, insignificant, or paltry.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Seven!

February 20, 2019

Here is a word from the French mal à propos, meaning “inopportune,” literally “badly (suited) to the purpose.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Sara had a knack for choosing malapropos moments for asking personal questions.”

malapropos

\ mal-ap-ruhpoh \, adjective;

  1. inappropriate; out of place; inopportune; untimely.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

New Embellishments?!

February 6, 2019

At the end of the workday, we all travel to a place we call home.  But what makes a place a “home?”  In a word, decoration.  What we choose to surround ourselves with to create a comfy and pleasing environment makes all the difference and should be a space we relish returning to.

decoration

\ dek-uhrey-shuh n \, noun;

  1. something used for decorating; adornment; embellishment.
  2. the act of decorating.
  3. interior decoration.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Forty-Six!

January 30, 2019

Here is a word from the Latin lambens, present participle of lambere, meaning “to wash, to lick.” As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“The coals had long been gray, but lambent tongues of flame continued to dance over the embers occasionally.”

lambent

\ lambuh nt \, adjective;

  1. running or moving lightly over surface.
  2. dealing lightly and gracefully with subject; brilliantly playful.
  3. softly bright or radiant

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Watch Your Phraseology!

January 16, 2019

According to the Oxford English Dictionary online, the word profane “carried the meaning of either “desecrating what is holy” or “with a secular purpose.” Usage of the term was discovered as early as the 1450s.

profanity

\ pruhfan-i-tee, proh- \, noun;

  1. the quality of being profane; irreverence.
  2. profane conduct or language; a profane act or utterance.
  3. obscenity.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com