Posts Tagged ‘www.dictionary.com’

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Four!

May 23, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin otiosis, meaning “at leisure, unemployed; out of public affairs.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Many of the men and women seen smoking behind the student center are not students at all, but otiose dropouts with nothing better to do.”

“You are wrong to think an action of the kind I have been discussing is otiose, rather than helpful to our cause.”

otiose

\ oh-shee-ohs, oh-tee- \, adjective;

1.  being at leisure; idle; indolent.
2.  ineffective or futile.
3.  superfluous or useless.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

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A Little Zest!

May 9, 2018

Today’s word while frequently tied to cooking, recipes, and flavoring, comes with additional definitions related to the vim and vigor that can accompany your life.  And let’s not forget the the brand of soap either.

zest

\ zest \, noun;

1. keen relish; hearty enjoyment; gusto.
2. an agreeable or piquant flavor imparted to something.
3. anything added to impart flavor, enhance one’s appreciation, etc.
4. piquancy; interest; charm.
5. liveliness or energy; animating spirit.
6. the peel, especially the thin outer peel, of a citrus fruit used for flavoring:

lemon zest.

verb (used with object)
7. to give zest, relish, or piquancy to.

 

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Three!

May 2, 2018

Here is a word from the Roman name Lucullus, the name associated with “the wealthy ancient general and administrator who liked his food and spared no expense when entertaining.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“Once Edgar became head of his company he achieved fame for the Lucullan feasts he provided for his numerous guests at his monthly first-Thursday-night galas.”

Lucullan

\ loo-kuhluh n \, adjective;

1. (especially of banquets, parties, etc.) marked by lavishness and richness; sumptuous.
2. of or relating to Lucullus or his life style.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Death and Taxes!

April 17, 2018

Happy Tax Day 2018!  According to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are several other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word tax (if you are so inclined for a little variety).  Enjoy!

tax

\ taks \

noun
1.  a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for
specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales,etc.
2.  a burdensome charge, obligation, duty, or demand.

verb (used with object)
3.  to demand a tax from (a person, business, etc.).
4.to demand a tax in consideration of the possession or occurrence of (income, goods,
sales, etc.), usually in proportion to the value of money involved.
5.  to lay a burden on; make serious demands on.
6.  to take to task; censure; reprove; accuse.
7.  Informal. to charge.
8.  Archaic. to estimate or determine the amount or value of.

verb (used without object)
9.  to levy taxes.

Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjectives, Number Thirty-Two!

April 11, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin operosus, meaning “industrious, active; laborious, elaborate”; from opus, meaning  “a work; workmanship; building.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“It did not take them long to devise a plan that was much less operose and could be done quickly.”

operose

opuh-rohs \, adjective;

1.  industrious, as a person.
2.  done with or involving much labor.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

The Brazenness!

April 4, 2018

Are you familiar with “the people of Walmart?”  It is a  website that features user-submitted photos of Walmart customers who are considered to be socially awkward or undesirable.  It often times highlights inappropriate clothing options.  You could say that is provides insight into the impudicity of some Walmart shoppers.

impudicity

\ im-pyoodis-i-tee \, noun;

1.   shamelessness; immodesty.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com

Amazing Adjective, Number Thirty-One!

March 21, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin niveus, meaning “snowy; snow-white.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“My old cottage looked imposingly dressed, the would-be poet said, just waiting to be escoted to a formal dance in the niveous stole of winter.”

niveous

\ niv-ee-uh s \, adjective;

1.  resembling snow, especially in whiteness; snowy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Thirty!

February 27, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin marmoreus, meaning “of marble, like marble”; from Greek mármaros, meaning “marble.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate.

“After we enjoyed the marmoreal pleasures of the Greek galleries, we sampled the armoreal offerings of the medieval rooms.”

marmoreal

\ mahr-mawr-ee-uh l, –mohr– \, adjective;

1.  of or like marble.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.

Loving!

February 14, 2018

Happy Valentines Day!  As we ponder the day, the day in which we show our “love” to those close to us, the word “loving” is pretty straightforward.  However, according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, there are a couple of other synonyms or variants (see below) that could be used to represent the word loving.  Enjoy!

loving

\ luhv-ing \, adjective;

1.  feeling or showing love; warmly affectionate; fond.
Other words you may consider using (depending on your context/usage, of course):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich. Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com.

Amazing Adjective, Number Twenty-Nine!

February 7, 2018

Here is a word from the Latin lanuginosus, meaning “downy,” from lanugo, meaning “wooliness,” + –osus, and adjectival suffix meaning “abouinding in.”  As exemplified in The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate,

“Where we had expected to find a scaly outer skin, we were surprised to find the creature had a lanuginose covering from neck to tail.”

lanuginose

\ luhnoo-juh-nohs, –nyoo– \, adjective;

1.  covered with lanugo, or soft, downy hairs.
2.  of the nature of down; downy.

Source: The Highly Selective Dictionary of Golden Adjectives for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich and http://www.dictionary.com.