Archive for the ‘Rankings’ Category

The Cost of Care!

March 16, 2017

Judging from the below data re: the cost of nursing home/long-term care, it might behoove me to remain in the State of Oklahoma in my retirement years.  Here’s a list of the states where these costs are least expensive as well as most expensive (median daily cost for long-term care in a semi-private room in 2016) . . .

Most Expensive:
1. Alaska ($800)
2. Connecticut ($407)
3. Massachusetts ($370)
4. New York ($361)
5. North Dakota ($359)
6. Hawaii ($355)
7. District of Columbia ($333)
8. New Jersey ($325)
9. New Hampshire ($320)
10. Delaware ($315)

Least Expensive:
1. OKLAHOMA ($145)
2. Texas ($148)
3. Missouri ($156)
4. Louisiana ($160)
5. Arkansas ($161)
6. Kansas ($171)
7. Iowa ($182)
8. Illinois ($184)
9. Nebraska ($185)
9. Utah ($185)

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2017, p. 44 (from Genworth 2016 Cost of Care Survey)

No Bank Account?!

January 14, 2017

While I don’t remember how old I was when I did it, opening my first savings account at the bank was a big deal.  Apparently, there are many households throughout the country that do not rely on banks at all and have neither a checking nor a savings account.  Here are the state rankings showing the highest and lowest percentages of households in which no one had a checking or savings account (according to the 2015 FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households).

Lowest percentage
1. Vermont (1.5%)
2. New Hampshire (1.8%)
3. Maine (2.3%)
4. Hawaii (2.4%)
4. Wyoming (2.4%)
6. North Dakota (3.0%)
7. Wisconsin (3.4%)
7. Minnesota (3.4%)
9. Alaska (3.5%)
10. Idaho (3.6%)

Highest percentage
1. Louisiana (14.0%)
2. Mississippi (12.6%)
3. Alabama (12.5%)
4. Georgia (11.9%)
5. Oklahoma (11.0%)
6. Tennessee (10.8%)
7. Arkansas (9.7%)
8. Texas (9.4%)
8. New Mexico (9.4%)
10. Kentucky (9.0%)

Source: AARP Bulletin, Databank USA, January-February 2017.

 

“Party On, Wayne . . . !”

December 31, 2016

On this, the eve of the new year, what better quotation to reference than the title of this post from the epic comedy “Wayne’s World” (1992).  Let this also serve as a reminder though that as you find yourself partying this evening . . . exercise common sense and moderation, and if you do overdo it on the consumption of alcohol, don’t even think about driving.

Allow me to also share with you the list of the states with the most and the least number (percentage) of senior adults (age 65+) who report either binge drinking or chronic drinking.  But before we get to the list, how about definitions of “binge” and “chronic” drinking?

Binge drinking is defined as five (5) or more drinks on one occasion within the last month (for men) or four (4) or more drinks (for women).

Chronic drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day (for men) or one drink per day (for women).

Highest percentage
1. Wisconsin (11.1%)
2. District of Columbia (9/8%)
3. Nevada (9.2%)
4. Hawaii (9.1%)
5. Oregon (9.0%)
6. Florida (8.9%)
6. Alaska (8.9%)
8. Washington (8.6%)
9. Vermont (8.5%)
9. California (8.5%)

Lowest percentage
1. Tennessee (2.9%)
2. Mississippi (3.2%)
3. West Virginia (3.3%)
4. Oklahoma (3.4%)
4. Utah (3.4%)
6. Kentucky (4.0%)
7. Alabama (4.3%)
8. Missouri (4.7%)
9. Kansas (4.9%)
9. Georgia (4.9%)
9. North Carolina (4.9%)
9. Indiana (4.9%)

Source: AARP Bulletin (December 2016) and the 2016 “America’s Health Rankings Senior Report.”

Where’s the Health Care?

October 19, 2016

Have you ever wondered which states offer the best “home health care?”  Well, wonder no more.  In the October 2016 issue of the AARP Bulletin they provide a state by state comparison of the number of personal and home health aides per 1,000 adults 75 years of age or older.

Highest number:
1. Washington, DC (302)
2. Hawaii (279)
3. Minnesota (268)
4. New York (242)
5.  New Mexico (211)

Lowest  number:
1. Florida (29)
2. South Dakota (49)
3. Mississippi (53)
4. Alabama (54)
5. Kentucky (57)

Source: 2016 America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, United Health Foundation (rounded to the closest number).

Best Cities for Running!

September 27, 2016

In the October issue of Runner’s World, they analyzed more than 250 cities (populations greater than 160K) with the highest number of households per capita who reportedly participated in some form of running over the last twelve months.  Data was gathered from a variety of sources to create five categories of special importance to runners (presence of sanctioned clubs, races, and running stores; the number of trails, open spaces, running tracks, etc.; ideal running weather; access to healthy food options; and safety [crime and traffic] for pedestrians).   Here’s the list of the top-50.

  1. San Francisco, CA
  2. Seattle, WA
  3. Boston, MA
  4. San Diego, CA
  5. Washington, DC
  6. Portland, OR
  7. Minneapolis, MN
  8. New York, NY
  9. Omaha, NE
  10. Denver, CO
  11. Chicago, IL
  12. Madison, WI
  13. Colorado Springs, CO
  14. San Jose, CA
  15. Los Angeles, CA
  16. Rochester, NY
  17. Pittsburgh, PA
  18. Tucson, AZ
  19. Raleigh, NC
  20. Boise, ID
  21. Oakland, CA
  22. Philadelphia, PA
  23. Sacramento, CA
  24. St. Louis, MO
  25. Buffalo, NY
  26. Virginia Beach, VA
  27. St. Paul, MN
  28. Richmond, VA
  29. Santa Rosa, CA
  30. Charlotte, NC
  31. Las Vegas, NV
  32. Tampa, FL
  33. Lincoln, NE
  34. Albuquerque, NM
  35. Cleveland, OH
  36. Cincinnati, OH
  37. Milwaukee, WI
  38. Atlanta, GA
  39. Des Moines, IA
  40. Irvine, CA
  41. Salt Lake City, UT
  42. Baltimore, MD
  43. Spokane, WA
  44. Honolulu, HI
  45. Indianapolis, IN
  46. Phoenix, AZ
  47. San Antonio, TX
  48. Miami, FL
  49. Oklahoma City, OK
  50. Houston, TX

Source: runnersworld.com/bestcities

The Costs of Water!

July 7, 2016

As with all things in life, the price you pay for your water can vary significantly from state to state.  Here are the most expensive (top five) and the least expensive (top five) states for the average annual household bill.  The costs are as of January 2015, rounded to the nearest dollar, and based upon the consumption of a 60,000 gallons per year.  Disclaimer: none of the 500 largest community water systems (VT and WY) or the systems privately owned (ID and WV) were included in this study.  Oklahoma’s annual expenditure per household for water is at $297.

Most expended
1. Hawaii ($606)
2. Nevada ($428)
3. District of Columbia ($420)
4. California ($386)
5. Pennsylvania ($382)

Least expended
1. Louisiana ($187)
2. South Carolina ($203)
3.  Nebraska ($224)
4. Utah ($232)
5. Minnesota ($236)

Source: Food and Water Watch.  AARP Bulletin, June 2016

Workplace Retirement Plans!

April 12, 2016

So, are you ready for retirement?  Have you saved sufficiently?  Do you work for an employer who has an employer-based account?  In the April issue of AARP Bulletin, there was a state-by-state comparison of the percentage of workers with employer-based accounts.  These percentages range from a high of 61% to a low of 38%.  Oklahoma fell right in the middle at 50%.  Here are the states with the five highest and the five lowest percentages of employer-based accounts:

Highest percentage
1.  Wisconsin (61%)
1.  Minnesota (61%)
3.  North Dakota (59%)
3.  Iowa (59%)
5.  New Hampshire (58%)
5.  Connecticut (58%)

Lowest percentage
1.  Florida (38%)
2.  Nevada (39%)
3.  Arizona (41%)
3.  New Mexico (41%)
5.  Texas (42%)

Source: PEW Charitable Trusts, data for full-time private-sector workers ages 18-64.

How Healthy is Your State?!

March 22, 2016

Here are the results of the United Health Foundation’s survey that ranks Americans’ health by state.  Factors considered in this assessment include diet, smoking, alcohol abuse, and obesity.  Hmm, Oklahoma is in the bottom five.

1.  Vermont
2.  New Hampshire
3.  Minnesota
4.  Hawaii
5.  Utah
6.  Massachusetts
7.  Wisconsin
8.  Colorado
9.  Oregon
10. Connecticut
11.  Maine
12.  Washington
13.  Maryland
14.  Rhode Island
15.  Iowa
16.  Nebraska
17.  Michigan
18.  Delaware
19.  North Dakota
20.  Idaho
21.  New York
22.  Arizona
23.  South Dakota
24.  Kansas
25.  Pennsylvania
26.  New Jersey
27.  Florida
28.  Virginia
29.  California
30.  Ohio
31.  Alaska
32.  North Carolina
33.  New Mexico
34.  Montana
35.  Wyoming
36.  South Carolina
37.  Illinois
38.  Missouri
39.  Georgia
40.  Indiana
41.  Texas
42.  Alabama
43.  Nevada
44.  Tennessee
45.  West Virginia
46.  Oklahoma
47.  Arkansas
48.  Kentucky
49.  Mississippi
50.  Louisiana

For more stats, visit: americashealthrankings.org

Source: AARP Bulletin, March 2016.

That’s a Lot of Tax!

January 11, 2016

I’m not a smoker, but the tax on cigarettes can vary greatly from state to state (who knew?).  Here are the states with the highest and lowest cigarette tax (per pack as of October 7, 2015).

Highest tax
1. Pennsylvania ($4.35)
2. Rhode Island ($3.75)
3. Connecticut ($3.65)
4. Massachusetts ($3.51)
5. Hawaii ($3.20)

Lowest tax
5.  North Carolina ($0.45)
4. North Dakota ($0.44)
3. Georgia ($0.37)
2. Virginia ($0.30)
1. Missouri ($0.17)

Source Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (rates do not include some local taxes or fees); and, AARP Bulletin, December 2015 issue.

How About a Date?

November 5, 2015

If you are wanting to enjoy a night out on the town, it shouldn’t be a problem in any of these towns.  Between the performing arts companies, museums, concert venues, sports stadiums, and movie theaters, you will have plenty of entertainment options in these top cities (courtesy of the AARP Bulletin).   Here are the top ten cities where entertainment is plentiful (based on city size — small, medium, and large).  For more details, check out AARP’s Livability Index.

Small cities
1.  Brentwood, TN
2.  Franklin, TN
3.  Spring Hill, TN
4.  Novato, CA
5.  San Rafael, CA
6.  Charlottesville, VA
7.  Fredericksburg, VA
8.  Pittsfield, MA
9.  Juneau, AK
10.  Barnstabletown, MA

Medium Cities
1.  Richmond, VA
2.  New Orleans, LA
3.  St. Louis, MO
4.  Santa Maria, CA
5.  Gresham, OR
6.  Atlanta, GA
7.  Fargo, ND
8.  Abilene, TX
9.  Yonkers, NY
10.  Minneapolis, MN

Large Cities
1.  Nashville, TN
2.  San Francisco, CA
3.  Washington, DC
4.  New York, NY
5.  Boston, MA
6.  Portland, OR
7.  Denver, CO
8.  Los Angeles, CA
9.  Austin, TX
10.  Seattle, WA

Source: AARP Bulletin (May 2015)