It Was Simple and Spacious . . . !

May 26, 2016

The verses definitely are coming together a lot more quickly (and easily) than the refrain.  Here’s the next verse.

In the middle of spring time,
Trees and flowers abloom,

A dream that won’t end,
Or disappear;
A dream that will offer you strength,
Year after year.

 

A dream that won’t end,
Or disappear;
A dream that will offer you strength,
Year after year.

The Urban Lifestyle!

May 25, 2016

I can’t explain it, but despite having grown up on a farm (a vineyard with winery, actually) in rural northern lower Michigan, I have always been drawn to the city.  I’m apparently much more comfortable with the hustle and bustle that accompanies an urban environment.  So here are some definitions of the word “city” that I found in my copy of The Cynic’s Dictionary by Aubrey Dillon-Malone.

“A place where you are least likely  to get a bite from a wild sheep.” (Brendan Behan)

“Not a concrete jungle, but a human zoo.”  (Desmond Morris)

“Millions of people being lonely together.”  (Henry Thoreau)

“The only desert still available to us.”  (Albert Camus)

Autumn at Medicine Park!

May 24, 2016

5375210_origHere is a painting that I acquired last year at an opening reception for a local artist, Micheal Jones, exhibit/show at Dana Jones Art (Art Studio and Gallery) in downtown Broken  Arrow.  I made the fatal mistake of attending this reception (with no intention of purchasing anything) and walked away as the new owner of this exquisite painting.  The artist: Micheal Jones; the title: Autumn at Medicine Part; the medium: oil; the dimensions (framed): 19 x 22; the enjoyment: ongoing.  I recently reconfigured the paintings hanging in my bedroom to accommodate, and more efficiently display, the many new acquisitions over the last year or so.  It is always a unique challenge (similar to a jigsaw puzzle) to effectively utilize the existing free wall space as my collection continues to grow.  I’m not out of space yet . . .

A Bit of Sarcasm!

May 23, 2016

I tend to use sarcasm as a form of humor, but sometimes I overdo it and my comments can come across as cruel, so I’m trying to work on not being such a mordant comedian.

mordant

\ mawr-dnt \; adjective,

1.  sharply caustic or sarcastic, as wit or a speaker; biting.
2.  burning; corrosive.
3.  having the property of fixing colors, as in dyeing.
noun,
4.  a substance used in dyeing to fix the coloring matter, especially metallic compound, as an oxide or hydroxide, that combines with the organic dye and forms an insoluble colored compound or lake in the fiber.
5.  an adhesive substance for binding gold or silver leaf to a surface.
6.  an acid or other corrosive substance used in etching to eat out thelines, areas, etc.
7.  Music. mordent.
verb (used with object),
8.  to impregnate or treat with a mordant

Self-Denied, Part Three!

May 22, 2016

Here is the continuation of “Self-Denied” generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  The first part of this poem poem was posted Friday, the second part was posted yesterday, and this the final part is posted today.  Enjoy!

The Self-Denied (Part 3)

. . . continued from Part 2 which was posted yesterday.

“But how can John that law obey,
“When you are cross, and answer nay?
“Believe me, Mary, you are wrong,
“Your body doth to John belong;
“And it is sin if you refuse
“What he by law is free to use.
“My godly wife, and all the wives
“In Glasgow, who lead praying lives,
“Whenever their husbands think it fit,
“Most cheerfully in this submit:
“You now have changed your stage of life,
“Then be a kind complying wife.”

‘Twas thus the reverend man advised,
Nor was his good advice despised;
Sweet Mary thanked him for his care,
And begged that they might join in prayer,
For asking counsel and direction,
For conduct and divine protection.

He prayed, and then the virgin bride
Confessed that she was edified;
That, by the help of grace and prayer,
She had got light in this affair;
So, after Mr. Clark was gone,
And she and spouse were left alone,
she warmly kissed the loving man,
And, smiling on him, thus began: —
“Dear friend, I have been in the wrong,
“Bit will not so continue long,
“The holy man was in the right,
“I’ll do what you desire at night;
“But if, till then, you’re loath to stay
“You only have the word to say,
“I know my duty’s to obey.
“Your purpose you may now fulfill,
“And use your hand-maid as you will.”

The husband’s heart was full of joy,
To find the bride no longer coy,
Yet did not dally,  like a fool,
To give the fair one time to cool:
but, with a thousand kisses, led
The silent Mary to the bed,
Where like a lamb she passive lay,
For she knew nothing of the way:
But soon he did her legs divide,
And in a moment made the bride
Cry out, “for God and Heaven’s sake John,
“O let! O let the thing along!
“Is this the conjugal delight?
“O cruel John, you kill me quite;”
“But now, ’tis in, ’tis in,” she cried,
“If God, by this, were glorified,
“And if it were for your soul’s gain,
“Though verily it gave me pain,
“I’d wish it never came out again.”

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of Mia treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

Self-Denied, Part Two!

May 21, 2016

Here is the continuation of “The Dream” generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  The first part of this poem poem was posted yesterday.  Enjoy!

The Self-Denied (Part 2)

. . . continued from Part 1 one which was posted yesterday, Part 3 will follow tomorrow.

The bridegroom, with her lecture vexed,
Said, “You have quite mistook the text;
“Else, tell me, Mary, where the sense
“Of giving due benevolence?”
Then quoted twenty scriptures more:
But she continued as before;
and, spite of all the bridegroom said,
Hoped in the Lord to die a maid:
She would her body keep from sin,
Not let the least defilement in.

Though John was young and full of vigor,
And Mary was a lovely figure.
He did not care to be at strife,
The very first night, with his wife;
And therefore let her rest till day,
then made another vain essay,
for godly Mary would not grant
To John the thing that John did want.

This much displeased the honest man,
Who dressed himself, and straightway ran
To Mr. Clark, and told his case,
How that his wife, mistaking grace,
The conjugal embrace denied,
Although in holy wedlock tied;
Then begged that he would let her know
That she did wrong in doing so.

The holy man first sighed, then said,
“I’ll commune with the erring maid,
“I hope, by scripture proofs, to make
“Sweet Mary part with her mistake:
“But I must tell you, honest friend,
“Her modesty I much commend:
“Since, trust me, John, ’tis very rare,
“To meet a woman young and fair,
“That can , in spite of titillation,
“Resist the lawful sweet temptation:
“‘Tis good to guard against the devil,
“And shun the appearances of evil.”

This said, conducted by her spouse,
Away he went to Mary’s house;
And, being left with her alone,
He thus begun: “Thy husband, John,
“Has made a sad complaint to me,
“That from his will you disagree,
“And that your body you deny,
“When he the wedlock joys would try;
“Mary, in this you are unjust,
“And what is lawful you call lust:
“The Lord did marriage institute,
“Ere eating the forbidden fruit;
“And Eve with Adam did agree,
“Else where had been posterity;
“You’ve heard how in a married life,
“The husband should cleave to the wife:

. . . continued tomorrow.

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of Mia treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

Self-Denied, Part One!

May 20, 2016

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  This particular poem will be continued with the second and third parts over the next couple of days.  Enjoy!

The Self-Denied (Part 1)

The other day I heard a tale
From Glasgow, famed for rum and zeal,
For sighing husbands, praying wives,
For looks precise, but cheating lives,
Of a young woman full of grace,
The most admired of all the place;
Who twenty sermons could tell over,
Though preached above six months before;
On week-day sermons took delight,
And evening lectures every night.
she always spoke in Scripture phrase,
And trod in sanctified ways,
Till, tempted by her holy life,
A merchant asked her for his wife.

“Good friend,” said she, “I’m not to learn,
“That, in a thing of such concern,
“A woman cannot be too nice,
“But of the Lord should ask advice;
“And if he leaves me in the dark,
“I’ll ask his servant, Mr. Clark.”

This answer filled the man with hope,
Who went contented to his shop;
While Godly Mary went to prayer,
And counsel asked in her affair.
The to her pious pastor walked,
And of the merchant’s offer spoke;
Where, after many to’s and fro’s,
Hew answered sagely, through the nose;
“Beloved Mary, babe of grace,
“I have considered on your case;
“The merchant leads a pious life.
“And well deserves a godly wife;
“And I believe, upon the matter,
“That neither of you can do better;
“Heaven bless you both, and may he be,
“A comforter and help to thee.”

She went away in great content,
And for the loving merchant sent,
Told him that Mr. Clark approved.
And all her scruples were removed.
The marriage day was fixed on this,
But Mary still denied the kiss.

Three Sundays passed in proclamation,
For all was managed with discretion;
They married were, and to their feasts,
The clergy were the only guests;
In place of mirth and merry airs,
Were exhortations, psalms and prayers.
The bride at last away was led,
The merchant followed her to bed.
Clark made a long and pithy prayer,
Held out his hands and blessed the pair.
Amen, cried out the wry-mouthed crew,
And, sighing, from the room withdrew.

The merchant, who was called John,
With his dear Mary left alone,
Her mouth and lovely bosom kissed,
Nor did the bride at all resist:
But when his hand he lower thrust,
“Pray John,” said she, “beware of lust,
“And take your busy hand away,
“Then listen, John, to what I say: —
“The scripture says, and it says true,
“We should all filthy thoughts subdue;
“But what you drive at is no less
“Than chambering and wantonness.
“King Solomon, the wise, the good,
“Though many things he understood,
“Has, in his book of Proverbs, said,
“The way of a man with a maid,
“To him was a deep mystery;
“Would you be wiser, John than he?
“Let us live pure nad undefiled,
“Not by the world and flesh beguiled,
“Resisting lust and each temptation,
“And thus work out our own salvation:
“Dear John, if you’ll be ruled in this,
“I’ll greet you with a holy kiss.

. . .  to be continued tomorrow.

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of Mia treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

. . . This Bachelor’s Dream!

May 19, 2016

I got hung up on the refrain last week, but here’s my stab at another verse.

In the middle of winter,
There’s a chill in the air,
But the fire’s burning warmly,
You haven’t a care.

A dream that won’t end,
Or disappear;
A dream that will offer you strength,
Year after year.

‘Neath a blanket of new snow,
In a world so serene,
A landscape so pretty,
A breathtaking scene.

A dream that won’t end,
Or disappear;
A dream that will offer you strength,
Year after year.

Hospitals!

May 18, 2016

As I sat in the laboratory waiting area of my doctor’s office awaiting some test results, I was perusing my copy of The Cynic’s Dictionary and ran across an entry that seemed most apropos for the day . . .

Hospital
“A building that ought to have the recovery room adjoining the cashier’s office.”  (Francis Walsh)

I’ve always been fortunate to have had fairly good medical insurance coverage, so this has not been my personal experience.  I have always maintained a very healthy lifestyle and have not required a hospital stay (at least not yet), but I liked this humorous quotation nonetheless.

 

You are the New Day!

May 17, 2016

I fell in love with this song the first time I heard it sung.  But when sung by the King’s Singers, well, say no more.  Positively fabulous.


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