The Final Four, 2015!

March 30, 2015

127Alrighty then, the second weekend of the NCAA College Basketball Tournament is in the books and the original field of 68 has now been reduced to the final four teams!  The pinnacle of the college basketball season is upon us.

From the Sweet Sixteen to the Elite Eight, all but one of the higher seeded teams advanced.  Michigan State was the lowest seed (#7) remaining in the Elite Eight following their victory over the University of Oklahoma on Friday.  Go Green!

From the Elite Eight to the Final Four . . . the #1 seeds advanced in three of the four regions . . . the Midwest (Kentucky), the South (Duke), and the West (Wisconsin).  But in the East, once again the Michigan State Spartans, a #7 seed, were able to advance by defeating the Louisville Cardinals (#4 seed) in overtime to secure their spot in the Final Four!  Woohoo, what a game!  Go Green!

Next up for the Spartans the Duke Blue Devils on Saturday for a chance to advance to the title game next Monday.

Sweet Sixteen to Elite Eight: here were the survivors . . .

Midwest
(#1) Kentucky 78 over (#5) West Virginia 39
(#3) Notre Dame 81 over (#7) Wichita State 70

East
(#4) Louisville 75 over (#8) NC State 65
(#7) Michigan State 62 over (#3) Oklahoma 58

South
(#1) Duke 63 over (#5) Utah 57
(#2) Gonzaga 74 over (#11) UCLA 62

West
(#1) Wisconsin 79 over (#4) North Carolina 72
(#2) Arizona 68 over (#6) Xavier 60

Elite Eight to Final Four: here are the survivors . . .

Midwest
(#1) Kentucky 68 over (#3) Notre Dame 66

East
(#7) Michigan State 76 over (#4) Louisville 70 in overtime

South
(#1) Duke 66 over (#2) Gonzaga 52

West
(#1) Wisconsin 85 over (#2) Arizona 78

Ethical Principles!

March 29, 2015

I originally encountered this word in The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily LIterate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Then when I attempted to find an example of its use in a sentence, I found this use in The Encyclopaedia Britannica: Latest Edition. A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences and General Literature, Volume 18: “It is only under the head of casuistry that ethics has been much cultivated as a separate science.”

casuistry

\ kazh-oo-uh-stree \, noun;

1.  specious, deceptive, or oversubtle reasoning, especially in questions of morality; fallacious or dishonest application of general principles; sophistry.
2. the application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.

Trivia in the Kitchen, Number Thirty-Three!

March 28, 2015

It’s the real thing . . . Coke, is!  Did you know that Coca-Cola was originally invented as patent medicine?  Coca-Cola was first served at Jacob’s Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia in 1886 and gets its distinctive flavor from a combination of kola nuts, vanilla, and cinnamon (the exact formula is a highly guarded trade secret).  According to Interbrand, Coca-Cola (which had the most valuable global brand in 2011) is currently (as of 2014) the third most valuable brand in the world behind Apple (#1) and Google (#2)    Coke products can be found in more than 200 countries worldwide with consumption exceeding 1.8 billion beverage servings per day! (2013)  Wow that’s a lot of Coke!

Thirty years ago, Coca Cola attempted to change the formula and introduced “New Coke.”  This product’s run was short lived amid tremendous backlash over the change and was only available between April 23, 1985 and July 10, 1985.   There was just too much nostalgia for the original drink.  To counteract this backlash, Coca Cola added the word “Classic” to the cans to rejuvenate the “image” of Coca Cola.  This Classic label wasn’t removed from their product line until 2011.

Spring, Time for Butterflies!

March 27, 2015

Are you looking for a fun craft project this weekend?  Then check out these origami butterflies . . . super easy to make, I promise.  Happy folding!

Bed-Time!

March 26, 2015

Here’s the next installment of manners and etiquette (courtesy of the Goops)?

Bed-Time
The night is different from the day —
It’s darker in the night;
How can you ever hope to play
When it’s no longer light?

When bed-time comes, it’s time for you
To stop, for when you’re yawning,
You should be dreaming what you’ll do
Whem it’s to-morrow morning.

Source: Goops and How to Be Them: a Manual of Manners for Polite Infants Inculcating Many Juvenile Virtues Both by Precept and Example by Gelett Burgess.

College Basketball 2015, Week Twenty!

March 25, 2015

127Oh, how sweet it is!  The first week of the NCAA Men’s College Basketball Tournament is in the books and the field of 68 has already been whittled down to the Sweet Sixteen!  And the Michigan State Spartans are among them.  They defeated the Georgia Bulldogs (#10 seed) on Friday and followed up with a victory over #2 seed Virginia on Sunday.  What an excellent weekend for the Spartans!  This week has the Spartans facing the Sooners of the University of Oklahoma for a chance to advance on to the Elite Eight!   Go Green!

Here are the survivors from last week’s match-ups:

Midwest
Kentucky (#1)
Notre Dame (#3)
West Virginia (#5)
Wichita State (#7)

East
Oklahoma (#3)
Louisville (#4)
Michigan State (#7)
NC State (#8)

South
Duke (#1)
Gonzaga (#2)
Utah (#5)
UCLA (#11)

West
Wisconsin (#1)
Arizona (#2)
North Carolina (#4)
Xavier (#6)

Heaven Versus Hell!

March 24, 2015

The definitions of words can vary greatly depending upon the dictionary one consults.  For example, according to a popular online dictionary (www.dictionary.com), heaven is defined as: “the abode of God, the angels, and the spirits of the righteous after death; the place or state of existence of the blessed after the mortal life.”  Hell is defined as: “the place or state of punishment of the wicked after death; the abode of evil and condemned spirits; Gehenna or Tartarus.”

Well, according to The Cynic’s Dictionary (by Aubrey Dillon- Malone), these words have drastically different (and certainly more amusing) definitions.

Heaven
“An English policeman, a French cook, a German engineer, an Italian lover — and everything organized by the Swiss.”  (John Elliott)

Hell
“An English cook, a French engineer, a German policeman, a Swiss lover — and everything organized by the Italians.”   (John Elliott)

Well Judged, Final Part!

March 23, 2015

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).

Well Judged, Part 4 (Final)

The alderman was well content,
And for his charming daughters sent,
To whom he told what Dick had said,
And hoped they would not be afraid,
Since sure it would be no hard task,”
To answer what his friend would ask,
And begged, since one must be the bride,
They’d lay all bashfulness aside.

The maids consented;Dick on this,
Of each fair sister took a kiss;
These kisses set his heart on fire,
And in him raised such strong desire,
That he stood trembling and amazed,
And on each lovely charmer gazed.

The masks were fixed, and Dick begun: —
“I wish dear ladies, I could shun
“The asking questions, but I find
“I am so much to all inclined,
“That, in my soul, I can’t agree
“Who is the dearest of the three;
Whoever I get, I’m sure of joys,
“Yet I’m confounded in my choice;
“But since you generously submit,
“To make a trial of your wit,
“Forgive me, fair ones, then, if I
“Hour knowledge by a question try;
“And pardon me, if to your ears
“The question something odd appears: —
“Whether the mouth that’s in your face,
“Or that in a more hidden place,
“The eldest is?  Who answers best,
“Shall triumph in my happy breast,
“A reason why she so believes.”

The masks their rosy cheeks concealed,
While blushing necks their shame revealed.

The first born  daughter said, “In truth
“I think the eldest is my mouth,
“Since in it there are teeth of bone,
“In that below I’m sure are non.”

The second said, “The seat of love
“Is eldest, for the mouth above
“Upon its lips no hair cna show,
“But I have got a beard below;”
And added, with an air so sage,
“Is not a beard a sign of age?”

The youngest sister, smiling, said,
“I’m but a young and silly maid;
“But yet I think the mouth above
“Is elder than the seat of love;
“And what I say I thus evince, —
“My upper mouth was weaned long since,
“And flesh, and fish, and bones can eat,
“But that below longs for the teat.”

Richard on this embraced the fair,
And for the youngest did declare.
He married her with great content
And never did his choice repent.

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of a treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

Well Judged, Part 3!

March 22, 2015

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  Here is part three; check back tomorrow for the fourth and final part to this poem.

Well Judged, Part 3

Dick, at this strange discourse amazed,
Upon the blushing sisters gazed,
He feared it was the effect of drink,
And knew not what to say or think:
No wealth, no money, had he got,
Nor was he worth a single groat.

But the alderman began again,
And did his former speech explain:
“Dear daughters, I of wealth have store,
“Nor do I ask or wish for more:
“Dick is my friend, and Dick you know,
“No kind of jointure can bestow;
“But Dick has sense, and Dick has wit,
“And Dick for every thing is fit,
“While elder brothers, as you know,
“Are good for nothing, but for show,
“I never could bear these gaudy boys,
“Of all mankind Dick is my choice.”

The smiling sisters owned, for truth,
They had no quarrel with the youth;
But yet they thought it was but fair,
That Richard should his mind declare,
On this the charming maids withdrew,
And left poor Dick in quite a stew.

The alderman, his daughters gone,
And he and Richard left alone,
A bumper filled. “Dear Dick,” said he,
“Here is a health to all the three,
“Take which of them best pleases thee.”

“Dear Sir,” said Dick, “I cannot tell,
“I love them all so very well;
“They all of them such charms possess,
“That I am puzzled, I confess;
“Had I but one bright beauty viewed,
“With ease she had my heart subdued;
“But when those three, with equal charms,
“A heart like mine at once alarms,
“Each formed alike for heavenly joys,
“I know not how to make a choice.”

“Paris, as I have lately told,
“(But that was in the days of old),
“When three bright ladies of the sky
“To him, as umpire, did apply,
“Made them their heavenly robes unpin,
“And stripped each goddess to the skin,
“But now such freedoms will not pass,
“Thought we with ease may find a lass,
“Yet such is now the sex’s pride,
“That though we latter, fawn, and beg,
“The saucy thing won’t show her leg.”

“Your daughters, Sir, are heavenly fair,
“But when their beauties I compare
“I freely own I can’t discover,
“To which of them I’m most a lover;
“But if their wit you’ll let me try,
“I’ll soon find out the mystery,
“Yet let each maid keep on her mask,
” ‘Til I one single question ask,
“For I must honestly confess,
“It savours much of wantonness,
“And on their cheeks may raise a blush,
“And that I swear, I do not wish
“But since I am to choose a wife,
“And that the comfort of my life,
“Depends upon my lucky chance,
“Forgive me this extravagance.”

. . .  to be continued with the final part tomorrow.

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of a treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).

Well Judged, Part 2!

March 21, 2015

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  This is part two of four.  The remaining two parts will be publish tomorrow and the day after.

Well Judged, Part 2

Down stairs they came, — and Richard swore,
He never beheld such charms before;
Beauty and youth, and every grace,
Alike adorned each smiling face;
A sprightliness in all appeared,
And every look his bosom cheered;
His soul was ravished with delight,
And fluttered at the joyous sight.

And now they all at dinner sat,
And passed their time in merry chat,
But love had rifled Richard’s quiet,
And made him quite neglect his diet;
By turns the sisters he surveyed,
And thus at length his wit displayed.

“The haughty wife of thundering Jove,
“Minerva, and the Queen of Love,
“Three goddesses (as we are told),
“From heaven came, in days of old;
“The prize of beauty was the end,
“That made the goddesses descend,
“Since Discord had an apple given,
“That much disturbed the peace of heaven:
“For she, till then, had been a guest
“At every marriage, every feast;
“But with her endless malice tired,
“Her presence they no more desired,
“This so enraged the spiteful dame,
“That she to high Olympus came,
“And among the goddesses she threw
“A golden apple, then withdrew,
“And grinning said,’Let this be given,
“To her that fairest is in heaven.’ ”

“Each goddess strove to seize the fruit,
“And raised in heaven a great dispute;
“But when the three that I have named,
“Each for herself the apple claimed.
“The lesser goddesses were mute,
“And left with grief the golden fruit;
“Yet would no god in heaven decree,
“Who had the advantage of the three.
“At last the gods desired that they
“To Ida’s mount would take their way,
“And there find out some shepherd youth,
“Whose untaught sould knew only truth,
“Free from ambition and from pride,
“Who only could the case decide.”

“O happy Paris! it was you
“Three naked goddesses did view,
“And to Love’s Queen gave up the prize;
“But spite of sense, and spite of eyes,
“If you had these bright sisters seen,
“The choice had not so easy been:
“You never had ended the dispute,
“Nor known to whom to give the fruit.”
Dick’s flattery all the maidens pleased,
While raptures on the father seized,
“Dear Dick,” he cried, “To tell the truth,
“Thou art a most bewitching youth;
“Whatever you do, with ease is done,
“I wish I had you for a son.
“And now, my friend, and daughters dear,
“To whatI say pray lend an ear:
“I wish, dear Richard, you’d agree,
“To take a wife out of the three;
“Ten thousand pounds to each I’ll give,
“And make it better if I live,
“And she on whom my Dicky pitches,
“Shall never complain for want of riches.”

. . .   to be continued.  Part three will be posted tomorrow!

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of a treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).


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