Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty-One!

April 28, 2017

Today’s fun fact will come from the category “food.”  Do you know after whom was the dish eggs Benedict  named?

They were NOT names after the American Revolutionary War traitor, Benedict Arnold, but rather Samuel Benedict, who, in 1894 ordered bacon and poached eggs on toast with Hollandaise sauce at New York’s Waldorf Astoria hotel.  Instead of the bacon and toast, he received ham on an English muffin and a new breakfast sensation was born.

Source: Sorry, Wrong Answer: Trivia Questions That Even Know-It-Alls Get Wrong by Rod L. Evans.

More Palindromes!

April 27, 2017

If you like palindromes, then visit this website.  The “longest palindrome” was pretty amazing.  Below was one of my favorites.

Dennis, Nell, Edna, Leon, Nedra, Anita, Rolf, Nora, Alice, Carol, Leo, Jane, Reed, Dena, Dale, Basil, Rae, Penny, Lana, Dave, Denny, Lena, Ida, Bernadette, Ben, Ray, Lila, Nina, Jo, Ira, Mara, Sara, Mario, Jan, Ina, Lily, Arne, Bette, Dan, Reba, Diane, Lynn, Ed, Eva, Dana, Lynne, Pearl, Isabel, Ada, Ned, Dee, Rena, Joel, Lora, Cecil, Aaron, Flora, Tina, Arden, Noel, and Ellen sinned.

A Fragrant Journey!

April 26, 2017

HoneysuckleI am truly fortunate to have honeysuckle growing alongside the trail that I usually walk/run upon.  This is one of nature’s aromatic fragrances and it is certainly a welcomed bonus to my exertions during exercise.  Here’s a photo I took last evening during my run.

Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Dipsacales
Family: Caprifoliaceae
Genus: Lonicera

Permeate!

April 25, 2017

While I like this word and use it on occasion, I am certainly open to using some of the synonyms below (when appropriate).  Even as these words are considered synonyms, there are always slight variations of meaning depending upon how they are used.  So, by all means, add some of these other words to your vocabulary, but don’t necessarily discard permeate completely.

permeate

\ pur-mee-eyt \, noun;

1.  to pass into or through every part of
2.  to penetrate through the pores, interstices, etc., of

3.  to be diffused through; pervade; saturate


verb
(used without object)
, permeated, permeating.
4.  to become diffused; penetrate

But according to my copy of The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate, here are some other options to help extend your vocabulary (depending on your specific need or usage):

Source: The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate by Eugene Ehrlich.  Definitions courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com

Breaking News!

April 24, 2017

On this day (in 1936) engineers from the RCA-Victor company provided the pictures/footage of firemen answering an alarm call in Camden, New Jersey.  This represents the first unscheduled event to be televised as it occurred.  It was shown in green tint, 5×7 inches, 24 pictures per second, on a 343-line screen.

Other “firsts” for April 24th include the following:

  • American naval victory in British waters during the Revolutionary War (1778)
  • College named after an American president (1783)
  • Health board established by a city (1795)
  • Docks owned by a state ((1863)
  • Organization to offer free lunches for the poor and sick (1873)
  • Medical society for African-Americans (1884)
  • African-American Catholic priest assigned to work in the United States (1886)
  • Round-the-world solo sailing journey (1895)
  • Skyscraper higher than 750 feet (1913)
  • Joint stock land bank (1917)
  • Army general to fly over enemy lines (1917)
  • Catholic nuns in a cloistered community (1922)
  • Fathometer (1928)
  • Pipeless organ (1934)
  • Glider commercial freight service (1946)
  • African-American professional basketball player (1950)
  • Civilian pilot wounded in Vietnam (1954)
  • Coast-to-coast telecast by satellite (1962)

Source: Famous First Facts (6th ed.) by Joseph Nathan Kane, Steven Anzovin, and Janet Podell.

Peter and the Wolf!

April 23, 2017

Happy Birthday Sergei Prokofiev (1891)!  Here’s one of his more famous pieces, “Peter and the Wolf” (and one of my favorites as well).  What an entertaining piece to both hold a child’s attention while at the same time teaching about an assortment of orchestral instruments.  Enjoy!

Some Humor for the Weekend!

April 22, 2017

Happy Saturday!  Here are a few computer-related jokes that I have had the pleasure of running across lately.  Enjoy!

Did you know that the oldest computer can be traced back to Adam and Eve?
Surprise!  Surprise!
It was an Apple.
But, it had extremely limited memory . . .
Just 1 byte . . .
Then everything crashed.

“If at first you don’t succeed, call it version 1.0.”

I changed my password to “incorrect,” so whenever I forget what it is, the computer will say “your password is incorrect.”

Computer: Press any key to start.
User: Where’s the “any” key?

Need a few more?  Check out this page.

 

Fun Fact Friday, Number Twenty!

April 21, 2017

The “heart” of the matter.  Today’s facts will center on unique facts about the heart.  Were you aware that . . .

  • a hummingbird’s heart beats 1,400 times per minute? (Real Fact #127)
  • the blue whale’s heart is the size of a small car? (Real Fact #232)
  • ancient Egyptians believed the “vein of love” ran from the third finger on the left hand to the heart?  (Real Fact #309)
  • the common garden worm has five pairs of hearts (Real Fact #750)
  • women’s hearts typically beat faster than men’s hearts?  (Real Fact #829)
  • the King of Hearts is the only king without a mustache? (Real Fact #1012)
  • an octopus has three hearts?  (Real Fact #1031)

Source: http://www.snapple.com/real-facts

Merely a Coincidence?!

April 20, 2017

Do you know the connections (or similarities) between Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy (and their assassinations)?  Are these merely coincidences or is this a part of something bigger?

  • Lincoln was elected in 1860
  • Kennedy was elected in 1960
  • Each name has seven letters
  • Both Presidents were slain on a Friday
  • Both were slain in the presence of their wives
  • Both were directly concerned with Civil Rights
  • Both Presidents had had the legality of their elections contested
  • Kennedy’s secretary, Lincoln, warned him not to go to Dallas
  • Lincoln’s secretary, Kennedy, warned him not to go to the theater
  • Both of their successors were named Johnson
    • Andrew Johnson
    • Lyndon Johnson
    • Each name contains thirteen (13) letters
    • Both served in the U.S. Senate
    • Both were southern Democrats
    • Andrew Johnson was born in 1808
    • Lyndon Johnson was born in 1908
  • Booth and Oswald were both southerners favoring unpopular ideas
  • Booth shot Lincoln in a theater and hid in a warehouse
  • Oswald shot Kennedy from a warehouse and hid in a theater
  • Booth and Oswald were murdered before their trials could be arranged
  • Lincoln and Kennedy were carried in death on the same caisson
  • Booth and Oswald were born 100 years apart
  • John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald, each name has fifteen (15) letters

Old Reeky!

April 19, 2017

Here is the next installment of poetry generally attributed to Thomas, the sixth Earl of Harrington (circa 1730).  Enjoy!

Old Reeky

In Edinburgh, famed for oysters and drink,
For noise in the morning, in the evening for stink,
I hear, for, thank Heaven, I was never there,
A dozen families live in one stair:
By this means the stairs are crowded all day.
And ladies and coal-bearers oft in your way:
So sometimes your shins, and sometimes your heart,
As Providence orders, may happen to smart;
But when night comes on, your danger grows great,
The stairs are all winding, they’re steep and they’re strait;
And if you are rash, and not circumspect,
Each step that you take, you venture your neck;
No lantern, no lamp, nor no kind of light,
Is used in that city, to guide you aright.

A comical fellow, who lately was there,
Declared, that, one evening a-climbing  a stair,
His hand held before him, as still he was wont,
Went plump to the knuckles in a lady’s —-
The inside was hot, and the outside was furred,
But yet its dumb owner spoke never a word,
But kicked like a devil: at last she cried out,
“You fumbling blockhead, what are you about?”

“By G-d,” said the fellow, who laughed at the joke,
“I’m glad that your ladyship silence has broke;
“Since you are a woman, I will thrust my —- in,
“But I thought you a cow by your —– and your kicking.”

Note: printed on the page following the title page was the following: “from a collection of poems that have been generally ascribed to Thomas, sixth Earl of Harrington. He was the son of Charles, the fifth Earl, and Margaret Lesslie, Countess of Rothes; and fought on the Royal side at the battle of Shirreffmuir, along with his brother John Lesslie, Earl of Rothes, and his own son, Lord Binning. These poems, according to Pinkerton, were printed about 1730, and have been reprinted in 1753, 1765, 1767, and 1777. He was also the author of Mia treatise on forest trees, which has gone through several editions. He died in 1735.” However, if these dates are correct (and I am by no means an expert historian in such matters), these poems could only have been written by either the first or second Earl of Harrington (William Stanhope and W.S. Jr.).